Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in people who are allergic or sensitive to lycopene, tomatoes, or other ingredients in lycopene-containing supplements. Allergic skin reactions and rashes have been reported after lycopene use.

Side Effects and Warnings

There is not enough evidence at this time on the safety of lycopene supplements. However, tomatoes and tomato-based products are common in human diets and lack reported side effects.

Use cautiously in people who have stomach ulcers or other stomach problems, or those taking stomach agents.

Lycopene may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people who have low blood pressure or those taking drugs or herbs and supplements that lower blood pressure.

Lycopene may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders or those taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Use cautiously in people who are taking estrogen, estrogen-like compounds, or other hormone therapy. Lycopene may interact with isoflavones.

Use cautiously in people who are at risk for prostate cancer. Lycopene may interfere with tests for prostate cancer.

Avoid in children and in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety information.

Avoid in people who are allergic or sensitive to lycopene, tomatoes, or other ingredients in lycopene-containing supplements. Allergic skin reactions and rashes have been reported after lycopene use.

Lycopene may also cause anorexia, chest pain, diarrhea, fat buildup under the skin, feeling of pressure in stomach, gassiness, heart attack, indigestion, nausea, skin discoloration, stomach pain, stomach ulcer irritation, vomiting, and worsened hot flashes.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There is a lack of scientific evidence on the use of lycopene during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com