Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

DHEA may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

DHEA may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be increased in the blood and may cause increased effects or potentially serious adverse reactions. People using any medications should check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.

DHEA may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. People taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or insulin should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist. Medication adjustments may be necessary.

Because DHEA contains estrogen like chemicals, the effects of other agents believed to have estrogen-like properties may be altered.

DHEA may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking drugs that lower blood pressure.

DHEA may interact with agents for Alzheimer's and arthritis; agents for the brain, heart, skin or urinary tract; agents that improve mental function; agents that may affect blood vessel width; agents that may affect GABA; agents that may affect the immune system; agents that may be toxic to the liver; agents that may lower seizure threshold; alcohol; androgens; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors; anticancer agents; antidepressants; antiestrogens; anti-inflammatories; antiobesity agents; antipsychotic agents; antiseptics; antiviral agents; aphrodisiacs; aromatase inhibitors; Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine; benzodiazepines; beta-blockers; birth control; bronchodilators (increase air flow to lungs); bupropion; calcium channel blockers; calcium salts; canrenoate; cardiac glycosides; cholesterol-lowering agents; cocaine; corticosteroids; danazol; estrogens; fertility agents; gefitinib; gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists; growth hormones; hormonal agents or hormone replacement therapy (HRT); human chorionic gonadotropin; methylphenidate; metyrapone; morphine; NMDA receptor antagonists; opiate antagonists; osteoporosis agents; oxytocics; stimulants; tadalafil; thyroid hormones; vaccines; and vitamin D analogs.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

DHEA may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

DHEA may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may become too high in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system.

DHEA may alter blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also alter blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Because DHEA contains estrogen like chemicals, the effects of other agents believed to have estrogen-like properties may be altered.

DHEA may cause low blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure.

DHEA may also interact with anticancer herbs and supplements; antidepressants; anti-inflammatories; antiobesity herbs and supplements; antioxidants; antipsychotics; antiseptics; antivirals; aphrodisiacs; bronchodilators (increase air flow to lungs); calcium; cardiac glycosides; carnitine; cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements; chromium; contraceptives; digitalis; fertility herbs and supplements; fiber; flavonoids; flaxseed and flaxseed oil; herbs and supplements for Alzheimer's and arthritis; herbs and supplements for the brain, heart, skin, and urinary tract; herbs and supplements that improve mental function; herbs and supplements that may affect blood vessel width; herbs and supplements that may affect GABA receptors; herbs and supplements that may affect the immune system; herbs and supplements that may be toxic to the liver; hormonal herbs and supplements; isoflavones; licorice; melatonin; opiate antagonists; osteoporosis herbs and supplements; oxytocics; phytoestrogens; polyunsaturated fatty acids; probiotics; seizure threshold-lowering herbs and supplements; soy; steroids; stimulants; thyroid herbs and supplements; vitamin D; vitamin E; yam.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com