Precautions

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure the medicine is working properly and to decide if you should continue to take it. Blood tests may be needed to check for any unwanted effects.

Do not take dexmethylphenidate together with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline [Eldepryl®], tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). Do not start taking this medicine during the 2 weeks after you stop a MAO inhibitor. If you take them together or do not wait 2 weeks, you may develop confusion, agitation, headaches, restlessness, stomach or intestinal symptoms, a sudden high body temperature, an extremely high blood pressure, or severe convulsions.

Dexmethylphenidate may cause serious heart or blood vessel problems. This may be more likely to occur in patients who have a family history of heart disease. Check with your doctor right away if you have chest pain, trouble breathing, or fainting while taking this medicine.

This medicine may cause some people to have vision changes or to become drowsy, dizzy, or less alert than they are normally. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are dizzy, not alert, or not able to see well.

Tell your doctor right away if you or your family notice any unusual changes in behavior, such as an increase in aggression, hostility, agitation, irritability, or suicidal thinking or behavior. Also tell your doctor if you or your child have hallucinations or any unusual thoughts, especially if they are new or getting worse quickly.

If you have been using this medicine for a long time and you think you may have become mentally or physically dependent on it, check with your doctor. Some signs of dependence may be:

  • A strong desire or need to continue taking the medicine.
  • A need to increase the dose to receive the same effects.
  • Withdrawal effects after stopping the medicine such as mental depression, nausea or vomiting, stomach cramps or pain, trembling, or unusual tiredness or weakness.

This medicine may cause slow growth. If your child is using this medicine, the doctor will need to keep track of your child's height and weight.

If you or your child experience a prolonged or painful erection of the penis for more than 4 hours, check with your doctor right away.

This medicine may cause Raynaud phenomenon, which is a problem with blood circulation in the fingers or toes. Tell your doctor if you have tingling or pain, a cold feeling, paleness, or skin color changes in the fingers or toes, especially when exposed to cold. Call your doctor right away if you have unexplained sores or ulcers on your fingers or toes.

Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This includes prescription or nonprescription (over-the-counter (OTC)) medicines, and especially those for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, allergies, or sinus problems.