Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to beta-carotene, vitamin A, or any other ingredients in beta-carotene products, such as food preservatives or dyes.

Side Effects and Warnings

Beta-carotene is likely safe when consumed by adults and children in food, in amounts found naturally in food.

Beta-carotene is possibly safe when used short-term as a supplement under the direction of a health care provider.

Beta-carotene may cause burping, constipation, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, increased risk of disease (including bladder cancer, colds, coronary heart disease, lung cancer, mortality, prostate cancer, and stomach cancer), joint pain, lung problems, muscle pain, stomach and intestine problems, vision problems, worsening cholesterol levels, yellow deposits in the eyes, and yellowing of the skin.

Beta-carotene may increase the risk of bleeding or bruising. Caution is advised in people with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Use cautiously in people who have eating disorders, eye disorders, kidney disorders, lung disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, or nervous system disorders.

Use cautiously in combination with antibiotics, cholesterol-lowering agents, fat substitutes, iron, lutein, mineral oil, nicotine, orlistat, plant sterols, proton pump inhibitors, very low-fat diets, and vitamin E.

Avoid using beta-carotene supplements alone or with other antioxidant vitamins, immediately before and after angioplasty (surgery for blocked arteries).

Avoid in children and in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

Avoid in people who smoke, drink high levels of alcohol, and have an increased risk of cancer, a history of exposure to asbestos, a liver disorder, or heart disease.

Avoid in people with known allergy or sensitivity to beta-carotene, vitamin A, or any other ingredients in beta-carotene products, such as food preservatives or dyes.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

There is a lack of scientific evidence on the use of beta-carotene supplementation during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com