Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Beta-carotene may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants ("blood thinners") such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

Beta-carotene may also interact with agents for the skin, eyes, stomach, intestines, lungs, or liver; agents for Alzheimer's, asthma, cancer, diabetes, gout, inflammation, or ulcers; agents that affect the immune, nervous, or musculoskeletal systems; alcohol; antibiotics; antivirals; cholesterol-lowering agents; heart agents; iron; mineral oil; nicotine; orlistat (Xenical®); or thyroid hormones.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Beta-carotene may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

Beta-carotene may also interact with alcohol; antibiotics; antioxidants; antiviral herbs and supplements; canthaxanthin; cholesterol-lowering herbs and supplements; fish oil; heart herbs and supplements; herbs and supplements for the skin, eyes, stomach, intestines, lungs, or liver; herbs and supplements for Alzheimer's, asthma, cancer, diabetes, gout, inflammation, or ulcers; herbs and supplements that affect the immune, nervous, or musculoskeletal systems; iron; lutein; lycopene; mineral oil; multivitamins; nicotine; plant sterols; red palm oil; sunflower oil; thyroid hormones; vitamins A, C, and E; or zinc.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com