Description and Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex

US Brand Name

  1. AHIST
  2. Alavert
  3. Allegra
  4. Aller-Chlor
  5. Aller-G-Time
  6. Antivert
  7. Atarax
  8. Benadryl
  9. Brovex
  10. Childrens Benadryl Allergy Fastmelt
  11. Childrens Pedia Care
  12. Clarinex
  13. Complete Allergy
  14. Compoz Nighttime Sleep Aid
  15. Diphen
  16. Dormin Sleep Aid
  17. Dramamine
  18. Dytan
  19. Dytuss
  20. FusePaq Dicopanol
  21. Histex PD
  22. Hydramine
  23. Lodrane
  24. Nolahist
  25. Optimine
  26. Pediatex 12
  27. Periactin
  28. Polaramine
  29. Q-dryl
  30. Quenalin
  31. Serabrina LA France
  32. Siladryl
  33. Silphen
  34. Simply Allergy
  35. Simply Sleep
  36. Sleep-Ettes D
  37. Sleep Formula
  38. Sleepinal
  39. Sominex
  40. Tavist
  41. Twilite
  42. Unisom
  43. Unisom Sleepgels Maximum Strength
  44. Vistaril
  45. Xyzal
  46. Zymine
  47. ZyrTEC

Canadian Brand Name

  1. Allergy Formula
  2. Allergy Formula Liquid
  3. Benadryl Allergy Childrens
  4. Benadryl Childrens
  5. Buckleys Jack Jill Bedtime
  6. Clear Allergy Formula For Adults And Children
  7. Diphedryl Clear
  8. Gravol
  9. Gravol Adults Suppository
  10. Gravol Childrens Suppository
  11. Gravol Juniors Suppository
  12. Hismanal

Descriptions


Antihistamines are used to relieve or prevent the symptoms of hay fever and other types of allergy. They work by preventing the effects of a substance called histamine, which is produced by the body. Histamine can cause itching, sneezing, runny nose, and watery eyes. Also, in some persons histamine can close up the bronchial tubes (air passages of the lungs) and make breathing difficult.

Some of the antihistamines are also used to prevent motion sickness, nausea, vomiting, and dizziness. In patients with Parkinson's disease, diphenhydramine may be used to decrease stiffness and tremors. Also, the syrup form of diphenhydramine is used to relieve the cough due to colds or hay fever. In addition, since antihistamines may cause drowsiness as a side effect, some of them may be used to help people go to sleep.

Hydroxyzine is used in the treatment of nervous and emotional conditions to help control anxiety. It can also be used to help control anxiety and produce sleep before surgery.

Some antihistamines are used in the treatment of chronic urticaria, which is a persistent hive-like rash.

Antihistamines may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Antihistamine preparations are available both over-the-counter (OTC) and with your doctor's prescription.

Do not give any over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicine to a baby or child under 4 years of age. Using these medicines in very young children might cause serious or possibly life-threatening side effects .

Once a medicine has been approved for marketing for a certain use, experience may show that it is also useful for other medical problems. Although these uses are not included in product labeling, some antihistamines are used in certain patients with the following medical conditions:

  • Appetite stimulant in children and adults (cyproheptadine)
  • Asthma together with asthma medicines before and during exposure to substances that cause reactions, to prevent or reduce bronchospasm (wheezing or difficulty in breathing) (cetirizine and loratadine)
  • Vascular headache treatment (cyproheptadine)

Importance of Diet

Make certain your health care professional knows if you are on a low-sodium, low-sugar, or any other special diet. Most medicines contain more than their active ingredient, and many liquid medicines contain alcohol.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Tablet
  • Syrup
  • Tablet, Extended Release
  • Capsule
  • Solution
  • Tablet, Chewable
  • Powder for Suspension
  • Liquid
  • Tablet, Disintegrating
  • Capsule, Liquid Filled
  • Elixir
  • Suspension
  • Film
  • Capsule, Extended Release
  • Suspension, Extended Release
  • Suppository

Before Using

Allergies

Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to medicines in this group or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully.

Pediatric

Serious side effects, such as convulsions (seizures), are more likely to occur in younger patients and would be of greater risk to infants than to older children or adults. In general, children are more sensitive to the effects of antihistamines. Also, nightmares or unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability may be more likely to occur in children.

Do not give any over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medicine to a baby or child under 4 years of age. Using these medicines in very young children might cause serious or possibly life-threatening side effects .

Geriatric

Elderly patients are usually more sensitive to the effects of antihistamines. Confusion; difficult or painful urination; dizziness; drowsiness; feeling faint; or dryness of mouth, nose, or throat may be more likely to occur in elderly patients. Also, nightmares or unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability may be more likely to occur in elderly patients.

Pregnancy

Hydroxyzine is not recommended for use in the first months of pregnancy since it has been shown to cause birth defects in animal studies when given in doses many times higher than the usual human dose. Be sure you have discussed this with your doctor.

Desloratadine and fexofenadine have not been studied in pregnant women. However, studies in animals have shown that these medicines cause birth defects or other problems when given in doses higher than the usual human dose. Before taking this medicine, make sure your doctor knows if you are pregnant or if you may become pregnant.

Azatadine, brompheniramine, cetirizine, chlorpheniramine, clemastine, cyproheptadine, dexchlorpheniramine, dimenhydrinate, diphenhydramine, doxylamine, and loratadine have not been studied in pregnant women. However, these medicines have not been shown to cause birth defects or other problems in animal studies.

Breastfeeding

Small amounts of antihistamines pass into the breast milk. Use is not recommended since babies are more susceptible to the side effects of antihistamines, such as unusual excitement or irritability. Also, since these medicines tend to decrease the secretions of the body, it is possible that the flow of breast milk may be reduced in some patients. It is not known yet whether cetirizine, desloratadine, or loratadine cause these same side effects.

Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking any of these medicines, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with a medication in this class or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Acecainide
  • Ajmaline
  • Amifampridine
  • Amiodarone
  • Amisulpride
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amoxapine
  • Amprenavir
  • Aprepitant
  • Aprindine
  • Arsenic Trioxide
  • Artemether
  • Astemizole
  • Azimilide
  • Bepridil
  • Bretylium
  • Brofaromine
  • Chloroquine
  • Cisapride
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clorgyline
  • Clozapine
  • Crizotinib
  • Dabrafenib
  • Darunavir
  • Delavirdine
  • Desipramine
  • Dibenzepin
  • Disopyramide
  • Dofetilide
  • Doxepin
  • Dronedarone
  • Efavirenz
  • Enflurane
  • Erythromycin
  • Escitalopram
  • Flecainide
  • Fluconazole
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Fosaprepitant
  • Foscarnet
  • Furazolidone
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Grepafloxacin
  • Haloperidol
  • Halothane
  • Hydroquinidine
  • Ibutilide
  • Imipramine
  • Indinavir
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Isoflurane
  • Itraconazole
  • Ivabradine
  • Ketoconazole
  • Lazabemide
  • Levomethadyl
  • Lidoflazine
  • Linezolid
  • Lopinavir
  • Lorcainide
  • Lumefantrine
  • Mefloquine
  • Mesoridazine
  • Methylene Blue
  • Metoclopramide
  • Mibefradil
  • Moclobemide
  • Nefazodone
  • Nelfinavir
  • Nialamide
  • Nortriptyline
  • Octreotide
  • Ondansetron
  • Pargyline
  • Pazopanib
  • Pentamidine
  • Phenelzine
  • Pimozide
  • Piperaquine
  • Pirmenol
  • Posaconazole
  • Prajmaline
  • Probucol
  • Procainamide
  • Procarbazine
  • Prochlorperazine
  • Propafenone
  • Quetiapine
  • Quinidine
  • Quinine
  • Rasagiline
  • Risperidone
  • Ritonavir
  • Saquinavir
  • Selegiline
  • Sematilide
  • Sertindole
  • Sevoflurane
  • Sotalol
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Spiramycin
  • Sulfamethoxazole
  • Sultopride
  • Tedisamil
  • Telithromycin
  • Terfenadine
  • Thioridazine
  • Tipranavir
  • Tizanidine
  • Toloxatone
  • Tranylcypromine
  • Trifluoperazine
  • Trimethoprim
  • Trimipramine
  • Troleandomycin
  • Vasopressin
  • Vemurafenib
  • Vilanterol
  • Vinflunine
  • Voriconazole
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolmitriptan
  • Zotepine

Using medicines in this class with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acecainide
  • Ajmaline
  • Alefacept
  • Alfentanil
  • Alfuzosin
  • Almotriptan
  • Alprazolam
  • Amiodarone
  • Amisulpride
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amobarbital
  • Amoxapine
  • Anileridine
  • Apomorphine
  • Aprindine
  • Arsenic Trioxide
  • Artemether
  • Asenapine
  • Astemizole
  • Azimilide
  • Azithromycin
  • Bretylium
  • Bromazepam
  • Buprenorphine
  • Buspirone
  • Butabarbital
  • Butorphanol
  • Carbamazepine
  • Carbinoxamine
  • Ceritinib
  • Chloral Hydrate
  • Chlordiazepoxide
  • Chloroquine
  • Chlorpromazine
  • Ciprofloxacin
  • Citalopram
  • Clarithromycin
  • Clobazam
  • Clomipramine
  • Clonazepam
  • Clorazepate
  • Clozapine
  • Codeine
  • Crizotinib
  • Dabrafenib
  • Dalfopristin
  • Dasatinib
  • Desipramine
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dexmedetomidine
  • Diacetylmorphine
  • Diazepam
  • Dibenzepin
  • Difenoxin
  • Dihydrocodeine
  • Diphenhydramine
  • Diphenoxylate
  • Disopyramide
  • Dofetilide
  • Dolasetron
  • Domperidone
  • Doxepin
  • Doxylamine
  • Droperidol
  • Encainide
  • Enflurane
  • Erythromycin
  • Escitalopram
  • Eslicarbazepine Acetate
  • Estazolam
  • Eszopiclone
  • Ethchlorvynol
  • Ethylmorphine
  • Fentanyl
  • Fingolimod
  • Flecainide
  • Fluconazole
  • Flumazenil
  • Fluoxetine
  • Flurazepam
  • Foscarnet
  • Gatifloxacin
  • Gemifloxacin
  • Granisetron
  • Halazepam
  • Halofantrine
  • Haloperidol
  • Halothane
  • Hydrocodone
  • Hydromorphone
  • Hydroquinidine
  • Hydroxytryptophan
  • Hydroxyzine
  • Ibutilide
  • Iloperidone
  • Imipramine
  • Isoflurane
  • Isradipine
  • Ivabradine
  • Josamycin
  • Ketazolam
  • Ketobemidone
  • Ketoconazole
  • Lanreotide
  • Lapatinib
  • Levofloxacin
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Levorphanol
  • Lidoflazine
  • Linezolid
  • Lithium
  • Lomitapide
  • Lopinavir
  • Lorazepam
  • Lorcainide
  • Lorcaserin
  • Lumefantrine
  • Meclizine
  • Mefloquine
  • Meperidine
  • Meprobamate
  • Methadone
  • Methotrimeprazine
  • Metrizamide
  • Midazolam
  • Mifepristone
  • Mitotane
  • Morphine
  • Morphine Sulfate Liposome
  • Moxifloxacin
  • Nalbuphine
  • Nelfinavir
  • Nicomorphine
  • Nilotinib
  • Nitrazepam
  • Norfloxacin
  • Nortriptyline
  • Octreotide
  • Ofloxacin
  • Ondansetron
  • Opium
  • Opium Alkaloids
  • Oxazepam
  • Oxycodone
  • Oxymorphone
  • Paliperidone
  • Papaveretum
  • Paregoric
  • Pazopanib
  • Pentamidine
  • Pentobarbital
  • Perflutren Lipid Microsphere
  • Phenobarbital
  • Piritramide
  • Pirmenol
  • Posaconazole
  • Prajmaline
  • Prazepam
  • Primidone
  • Probucol
  • Procainamide
  • Procarbazine
  • Prochlorperazine
  • Promethazine
  • Propafenone
  • Propofol
  • Propoxyphene
  • Protriptyline
  • Quazepam
  • Quetiapine
  • Quinidine
  • Quinine
  • Quinupristin
  • Ramelteon
  • Ranolazine
  • Remifentanil
  • Risperidone
  • Roxithromycin
  • Salmeterol
  • Saquinavir
  • Secobarbital
  • Sematilide
  • Sertraline
  • Sevoflurane
  • Siltuximab
  • Simeprevir
  • Sodium Phosphate
  • Sodium Phosphate, Dibasic
  • Sodium Phosphate, Monobasic
  • Solifenacin
  • Sorafenib
  • Sotalol
  • Spiramycin
  • Sufentanil
  • Sulfamethoxazole
  • Sultopride
  • Sunitinib
  • Tapentadol
  • Tedisamil
  • Telavancin
  • Telithromycin
  • Temazepam
  • Terfenadine
  • Tetrabenazine
  • Thioridazine
  • Tilidine
  • Tizanidine
  • Tocophersolan
  • Topiramate
  • Toremifene
  • Tramadol
  • Trazodone
  • Triazolam
  • Trifluoperazine
  • Trimethoprim
  • Trimipramine
  • Umeclidinium
  • Vandetanib
  • Vardenafil
  • Vasopressin
  • Vemurafenib
  • Vilanterol
  • Vinflunine
  • Voriconazole
  • Vortioxetine
  • Zaleplon
  • Zileuton
  • Ziprasidone
  • Zolpidem
  • Zopiclone
  • Zotepine

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Using medicines in this class with any of the following is usually not recommended, but may be unavoidable in some cases. If used together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use your medicine, or give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

  • Ethanol
  • Grapefruit Juice

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of medicines in this class. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Enlarged prostate or
  • Urinary tract blockage or difficult urination—Antihistamines may make urinary problems worse.
  • Glaucoma—These medicines may cause a slight increase in inner eye pressure that may make the condition worse.
  • Intestinal obstruction or
  • Stomach ulcer—Use of cyproheptadine may make these conditions worse.
  • Liver disease or
  • Kidney disease—Effects of desloratadine may be increased because of slower removal from the body.

Proper Use

For patients taking this medicine by mouth:

  • Antihistamines can be taken with food or a glass of water or milk to lessen stomach irritation if necessary.
  • If you are taking the extended-release tablet form of this medicine, swallow the tablets whole. Do not break, crush, or chew before swallowing.

For patients taking dimenhydrinate or diphenhydramine for motion sickness:

  • Take this medicine at least 30 minutes or, even better, 1 to 2 hours before you begin to travel.

For patients using the suppository form of this medicine:

  • To insert suppository: First remove the foil wrapper and moisten the suppository with cold water. Lie down on your side and use your finger to push the suppository well up into the rectum. If the suppository is too soft to insert, chill the suppository in the refrigerator for 30 minutes or run cold water over it before removing the foil wrapper.

For patients using the injection form of this medicine:

  • If you will be giving yourself the injection, make sure you understand exactly how to give it. If you have any questions about this, check with your health care professional.

Antihistamines are used to relieve or prevent the symptoms of your medical problem. Take them only as directed. Do not take more of them and do not take them more often than recommended on the label, unless otherwise directed by your doctor. To do so may increase the chance of side effects.

Dosing

The dose medicines in this class will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of these medicines. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

For use as an antihistamine:

For azatadine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults—1 to 2 milligrams (mg) every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 12 years of age and older—0.5 mg to 1 mg two times a day as needed.
    • Children 4 to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For brompheniramine

  • For regular (short-acting) oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—4 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—2 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—1 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults and teenagers—10 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle, under the skin, or into a vein every eight to twelve hours.
    • Children 4 to 12 years of age—0.125 mg per kilogram (0.06 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle, under the skin, or into a vein three or four times a day as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For cetirizine

  • For oral dosage forms (syrup and tablets):
    • Adults—5 to 10 milligrams (mg) once a day.
    • Children 6 years of age and older—5 to 10 mg once a day.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—2.5 mg once a day, up to a maximum of 5 mg once a day or 2.5 mg twice a day.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For chlorpheniramine

  • For regular (short-acting) oral dosage forms (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—4 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—2 mg three or four times a day as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For long-acting oral dosage forms (capsules or tablets):
    • Adults—8 or 12 milligrams (mg) every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 12 years of age and older—8 mg every twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—5 to 40 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle, into a vein, or under the skin.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—0.0875 mg per kilogram (0.04 mg per pound) of body weight injected under the skin every six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For clemastine

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—1.34 milligrams (mg) two times a day or 2.68 mg one to three times a day as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—0.67 to 1.34 mg two times a day.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For cyproheptadine

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and children 14 years of age and older—4 milligrams (mg) every eight hours. The doctor may increase the dose if needed.
    • Children 6 to 14 years of age—4 mg every eight to twelve hours as needed
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—2 mg every eight to twelve hours as needed
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For desloratadine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults and children 12 years of age and older—5 milligrams (mg) once a day.
    • Children 4 to 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For dexchlorpheniramine

  • For regular (short-acting) oral dosage form (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—2 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 5 to 12 years of age—1 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 5 years of age—0.5 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For long-acting oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults—4 or 6 milligrams (mg) every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For diphenhydramine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—25 to 50 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—12.5 to 25 mg every four to six hours.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—6.25 to 12.5 mg every four to six hours.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—10 to 50 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle or into a vein.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—1.25 mg per kg (0.6 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle four times a day.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For doxylamine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults and teenagers—12.5 to 25 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—6.25 to 12.5 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For fexofenadine

  • For oral dosage form (capsules):
    • Adults and teenagers—60 milligrams (mg) two times a day as needed or 180 mg once a day.
    • Children 6 to 11 years of age—30 mg twice a day as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For loratadine

  • For oral dosage forms (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and children 6 years of age and older—10 milligrams (mg) once a day.
    • Children 4 to 5 years of age—5 mg once a day.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For phenindamine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults and teenagers—25 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—12.5 mg every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For nausea, vomiting, and vertigo (only dimenhydrinate and diphenhydramine are used for vertigo):

For dimenhydrinate

  • For regular (short-acting) oral dosage forms (tablets or liquid):
    • Adults and teenagers—50 to 100 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 12 years of age—25 to 50 mg every six to eight hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—12.5 to 25 mg every six to eight hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For long-acting oral dosage forms (capsules):
    • Adults—1 capsule (contains 25 milligrams [mg] for immediate action and 50 mg for long action) every twelve hours.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—50 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle or into a vein every four hours as needed.
    • Children 2 years of age and older—1.25 mg per kg (0.6 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle or into a vein every six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For suppository dosage form:
    • Adults—50 to 100 milligrams (mg) inserted into the rectum every six to eight hours as needed.
    • Children 12 years of age and older—50 mg inserted into the rectum every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 8 to 12 years of age—25 to 50 mg inserted into the rectum every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 6 to 8 years of age—12.5 to 25 mg inserted into the rectum every eight to twelve hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For diphenhydramine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—25 to 50 milligrams (mg) every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—1 to 1.5 mg per kg (0.45 to 0.7 mg per pound) of body weight every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—10 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle or into a vein. Dose may be increased to 25 to 50 mg every two to three hours.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—1 to 1.5 mg per kg (0.45 to 0.68 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle every six hours.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For hydroxyzine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—25 to 100 milligrams (mg) three or four times a day as needed.
    • Children 6 years of age and older—12.5 to 25 mg every six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 to 6 years of age—12.5 mg every six hours as needed.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—25 to 100 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—1 mg per kg (0.45 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For Parkinson's disease:

For diphenhydramine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—25 milligrams (mg) three times a day when starting treatment. Your doctor may increase the dose gradually later if needed.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—10 to 50 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle or into a vein.
    • Children—1.25 mg per kg (0.6 mg per pound) of body weight four times a day injected into a muscle.

For use as a sedative (to help sleep):

For diphenhydramine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—50 milligrams (mg) twenty to thirty minutes before bedtime if needed.

For doxylamine

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • Adults—25 milligrams (mg) thirty minutes before bedtime if needed.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

For hydroxyzine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—50 to 100 milligrams (mg).
    • Children 4 years of age and older—0.6 mg per kg (0.3 mg per pound) of body weight.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—50 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle.

For anxiety:

For hydroxyzine

  • For oral dosage forms (capsules, tablets, or liquid):
    • Adults—50 to 100 milligrams (mg).
    • Children 4 years of age and older—0.6 mg per kg (0.3 mg per pound) of body weight.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .
  • For injection dosage form:
    • Adults—50 to 100 milligrams (mg) injected into a muscle every four to six hours as needed.
    • Children 4 years of age and older—1 mg per kilogram (0.45 mg per pound) of body weight injected into a muscle.
    • Children and infants up to 4 years of age—Use is not recommended .

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing.

Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed.

Precautions

Before you have any skin tests for allergies, tell the doctor in charge that you are taking this medicine. The results of the test may be affected by this medicine.

When taking antihistamines on a regular basis, make sure your doctor knows if you are taking large amounts of aspirin at the same time (as for arthritis or rheumatism). Effects of too much aspirin, such as ringing in the ears, may be covered up by the antihistamine.

Antihistamines will add to the effects of alcohol and other CNS depressants (medicines that slow down the nervous system, possibly causing drowsiness). Some examples of CNS depressants are sedatives, tranquilizers, or sleeping medicine; prescription pain medicine or narcotics; barbiturates; medicine for seizures; muscle relaxants; or anesthetics, including some dental anesthetics. Check with your doctor before taking any of the above while you are using this medicine.

This medicine may cause some people to become drowsy or less alert than they are normally. Even if taken at bedtime, it may cause some people to feel drowsy or less alert on arising. Some antihistamines are more likely to cause drowsiness than others. Drowsiness is less likely with cetirizine, and rare with desloratadine and loratadine. Make sure you know how you react to the antihistamine you are taking before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert.

Antihistamines may cause dryness of the mouth, nose, and throat. Some antihistamines are more likely to cause dryness of the mouth than others . For temporary relief of mouth dryness, use sugarless candy or gum, melt bits of ice in your mouth, or use a saliva substitute. However, if your mouth continues to feel dry for more than 2 weeks, check with your medical doctor or dentist. Continuing dryness of the mouth may increase the chance of dental disease, including tooth decay, gum disease, and fungus infections.

For patients using dimenhydrinate, diphenhydramine, or hydroxyzine:

  • This medicine controls nausea and vomiting. For this reason, it may cover up the signs of overdose caused by other medicines or the symptoms of appendicitis. This will make it difficult for your doctor to diagnose these conditions. Make sure your doctor knows that you are taking this medicine if you have other symptoms of appendicitis such as stomach or lower abdominal pain, cramping, or soreness. Also, if you think you may have taken an overdose of any medicine, tell your doctor that you are taking this medicine.

For patients using diphenhydramine or doxylamine as a sleeping aid:

  • If you are already taking a sedative or tranquilizer, do not take this medicine without consulting your doctor first.

Side Effects

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare

  1. Abdominal or stomach pain
  2. burning
  3. chills
  4. clay-colored stools or dark urine
  5. cough
  6. diarrhea
  7. difficulty swallowing
  8. dizziness
  9. fast or irregular heartbeat
  10. fever
  11. headache
  12. hives
  13. itching
  14. prickly sensations
  15. puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips or tongue
  16. redness of skin
  17. seizures
  18. shortness of breath
  19. skin rash
  20. swelling
  21. tightness in chest
  22. tingling
  23. unusual tiredness or weakness
  24. wheezing

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

Less common or rare

  1. Sore throat
  2. unusual bleeding or bruising
  3. unusual tiredness or weakness

Symptoms of overdose

  1. Clumsiness or unsteadiness
  2. convulsions (seizures)
  3. drowsiness (severe)
  4. dryness of mouth, nose, or throat (severe)
  5. feeling faint
  6. flushing or redness of face
  7. hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there)
  8. shortness of breath or troubled breathing
  9. trouble in sleeping

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

  1. Drowsiness
  2. dry mouth, nose, or throat
  3. gastrointestinal upset, stomach pain, or nausea
  4. headache
  5. increased appetite and weight gain
  6. thickening of mucus

Less common or rare

  1. Acid or sour stomach
  2. belching
  3. blurred vision or any change in vision
  4. body aches or pain
  5. clumsiness or unsteadiness
  6. confusion (not with diphenhydramine)
  7. congestion
  8. constipation
  9. cough
  10. diarrhea
  11. difficult or painful urination
  12. difficulty in moving
  13. difficult or painful menstruation
  14. dizziness (not with brompheniramine or hydroxyzine)
  15. drowsiness (with high doses of desloratadine and loratadine)
  16. dryness of mouth, nose, or throat
  17. early menstruation
  18. fast heartbeat
  19. fever
  20. heartburn
  21. hoarseness
  22. increased sensitivity of skin to sun
  23. increased sweating
  24. indigestion
  25. loss of appetite
  26. joint pain
  27. muscle aching or cramping
  28. muscle pains or stiffness
  29. nausea
  30. nightmares (not with azatadine, chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine, desloratadine, hydroxyzine, or loratadine)
  31. ringing or buzzing in ears
  32. runny nose
  33. skin rash
  34. swollen joints
  35. stomach discomfort, upset or pain
  36. tender swollen glands in neck
  37. tremor
  38. unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability
  39. vomiting

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.