Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (18 years and older)

For a chemotherapy adjuvant, 10 milliliters of a blend containing 300 grams of fresh aloe leaves, 500 grams of honey, and 40 milliliters of 40% alcohol has been taken three times daily by mouth every day either with or after chemotherapy administration.

For constipation, the dose suggested is 0.04-0.17 grams of dried juice (corresponding to 10-30 milligrams of hydroxyanthraquinones).

For dental plaque and gum disease, a toothpaste containing aloe has been used three times daily for 30 days.

For diabetes, a dose of 5-15 milliliters of aloe juice twice daily has been taken by mouth. One capsule containing 300 milligrams of aloe extract has been taken by mouth twice daily for two months. One tablespoon of aloe has been taken by mouth twice daily for 42 days.

For dry skin, a formulation with freeze-dried aloe extract was applied to the forearm for up to two weeks.

For genital herpes, a cream with aloe extract has been applied to lesions three times daily for five days per week, for up to two weeks.

For gum disease, aloe-containing toothpaste has been used daily for 24 weeks.

For heart disease, one 120 milliliter dose of a solution containing 1,200 milligrams of aloe has been taken by mouth.

For high cholesterol, 10-20 milliliters of aloe has been taken by mouth daily for 12 weeks. One capsule containing 300 milligrams of aloe extract has been taken by mouth twice daily for two months.

For HIV infection, a dose of 1,000-1,600 milligrams of acemannan (aloe extract) has been taken by mouth in four equal doses daily for 48 weeks. Additionally, 30-40 milliliters of aloe gruel has been taken by mouth daily for an unknown duration.

For inflammation (osteitis), a SaliCept patch, which contained acemannan (aloe extract), was applied to the tooth socket once and then again three days after the first treatment.

For inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis), aloe gel has been taken by mouth at a dose of 100 milliliters twice daily for four weeks.

For lichen planus, an aloe gel containing 70% aloe mucilage (sticky substance from aloe) has been applied to the skin twice daily for eight weeks. Additionally, 0.4 milliliters of 70% aloe solution has been held in the mouth for one minute up to three times daily for 12 weeks. Aloe mouthwash (two tablespoons swished for two minutes) on mouth lesions has been used four times daily for one month.

For liver disease, 0.05 grams of high-molecular-weight fractions of aloe has been taken by mouth three times daily for 12 weeks.

For mucositis (mouth ulcers), 15-20 milliliters of aloe solution has been used in the mouth 1-3 times daily for up to eight weeks while receiving radiotherapy.

For psoriasis (inflammatory skin condition), a cream containing aloe has been applied to the skin three times daily for five consecutive days per week, for up to four weeks. A commercial aloe gel has also been used.

For radiation-induced skin injury, participants receiving radiation therapy for breast cancer applied aloe gel twice daily to the skin, in combination with usual care.

For seborrheic dermatitis (seborrhea, dandruff), a 30% aloe mixture has been applied to the skin twice daily for 4-6 weeks.

For skin burns, a 97.5% aloe gel has been applied to an irradiated skin area on two subsequent days. A burn on one side of the body was treated with topical aloe cream twice daily until the burn healed. Aloe mucilage (sticky substance from aloe) has been applied twice daily until either the burns were healed or the patient left the hospital.

For wound healing, a wound gel with aloe or a skin gel with aloe has been applied to the skin up to three times daily until the wound healed. A cream (3 grams) containing 0.5% aloe gel powder has been applied to the skin immediately after surgery and 12 hours after surgery. Aloe treatments have included topical creams, mucilage (sticky substance from aloe), gel dressings, and gels. Aloe products have been applied from three times daily to every third day for 2-19 weeks or until the wounds were healed.

The suggested dosage for injectable acemannan is lacking because safety has not been sufficiently evaluated. Four cases of death have been associated with aloe injections under unclear circumstances.

Children (younger than 18 years)

Use of aloe gel applied to the skin in children is common and appears to be well tolerated. Aloe taken by mouth or injected into the blood has not been studied in children.

This evidence-based monograph was prepared by The Natural Standard Research Collaboration

www.naturalstandard.com