Diagnosis

Before diagnosing vulvodynia, your doctor will ask you questions about your medical, sexual and surgical history and to understand the location, nature and extent of your symptoms.

Your doctor might also perform a:

  • Pelvic exam. Your doctor visually examines your external genitals and vagina for signs of infection or other causes of your symptoms. Even if there's no visual evidence of infection, your doctor might take a sample of cells from your vagina to test for an infection, such as a yeast infection or bacterial vaginosis.
  • Cotton swab test. Your doctor uses a moistened cotton swab to gently check for specific, localized areas of pain in your vulvar region.
July 22, 2017
References
  1. Stewart EG. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of generalized vulvodynia. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 1, 2017.
  2. Spadt SK, et al. Treatment of vulvodynia (vulvar pain of unknown cause). https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 1, 2017.
  3. What is vulvodynia?. National Vulvodynia Association. https://www.nva.org/what-is-vulvodynia/. Accessed May 1, 2017.
  4. Frequently asked questions. Gynecologic problems FAQ127. Vulvodynia. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/~/media/For%20Patients/faq127.pdf?dmc=1&ts=20140511T1425064797. Accessed May 1, 2017.
  5. Vulvodynia. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/vulvodynia/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed May 1, 2017.