Lifestyle and home remedies

By Mayo Clinic Staff

If you're at risk of ventricular fibrillation, taking steps to improve your heart health will decrease the chances of your heart going into ventricular fibrillation. But, you should talk to your doctor about purchasing a home automated external defibrillator (AED) if you have serious concerns.

Home automated external defibrillators (AEDs)

If you're at risk of ventricular fibrillation and don't have an ICD, you may want to consider purchasing a home automated external defibrillator (AED) after talking to your doctor. If you're experiencing ventricular fibrillation and an AED is on hand, a bystander could grab it and easily connect it to your chest to check your heart rhythm. If your heart rhythm can be treated with an electric shock, the AED automatically sends an electrical current to your heart muscle. That jolt could reset your heart back into a normal rhythm, possibly saving your life.

If you plan to use an AED on someone, it's still critical that you call 911 or your local emergency services to get help on the way before you begin using the AED.

Nov. 01, 2011

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