Uterine prolapse care at Mayo Clinic

Your Mayo Clinic care team

Mayo Clinic's uterine prolapse team includes specialists trained in female pelvic floor medicine (urogynecologists). Urogynecologists undergo three years of training in women's pelvic health and pelvic reconstructive surgery after completing four years of general obstetrics and gynecology training.

Having all of this subspecialized expertise in a single place, focused on you, means that you're not just getting one opinion — care is discussed among the team, appointments are scheduled in coordination, and highly specialized pelvic floor disorder experts are all working together to determine what's best for you.

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Uterine prolapse is often associated with other pelvic floor disorders. Mayo Clinic has advanced imaging to assist with diagnosis of complex pelvic floor conditions, including the full range of urodynamic testing.

Nonsurgical treatment often involves intensive pelvic floor retraining exercises, biofeedback training and constipation education classes led by a dietitian and a nurse educator. Research indicates that about half of women who have only verbal instructions in Kegel exercises don't perform them effectively. At Mayo Clinic, physical therapists work with you to help you learn to perform Kegel exercises effectively.

Other nonsurgery specialty services offered at Mayo Clinic include:

  • Minimally invasive injection therapies
  • Botox injections of the urinary tract
  • Neuromodulation for the urinary tract

If surgery is needed, Mayo Clinic specialists have experience with procedures to repair complex pelvic floor conditions, including management of mesh complications.

If you need a hysterectomy, your Mayo Clinic surgeon will choose minimally invasive surgery — performed through an incision in the vagina or through small abdominal incisions (laparoscopic surgery) — whenever possible. Depending on your needs, you may be a candidate for robotic hysterectomy.

Nationally recognized expertise

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for gynecology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings.

Aug. 02, 2017
References
  1. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  2. Ferri FF. Pelvic organ prolapse (uterine prolapse). In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 14, 2017.
  3. Rogers RG, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  4. Handa VL. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse associated with pregnancy and childbirth. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic organ prolapse (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  6. Fashokun TB, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Diagnostic evaluation. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 10, 2017.
  7. Ridgeway BM. Does prolapse equal hysterectomy? The role of uterine conservation in women with uterovaginal prolapse. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;213:802.
  8. Lobo RA, et al. Lower urinary tract function and disorders: Physiology and micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 13, 2017.
  9. Hokenstad ED, et al. Health-related quality of life and outcomes after surgical treatment of complications from vaginally placed mesh. Female Pelvic Medicine & Reproductive Surgery. 2015;21:176.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2017.