Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

Depending on the severity of your uterine prolapse, self-care measures may provide relief. Try to:

  • Perform Kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic muscles and support the weakened fascia
  • Avoid constipation by eating high-fiber foods and drinking plenty of fluids
  • Avoid bearing down to move your bowels
  • Avoid heavy lifting
  • Control coughing
  • Lose weight if you're overweight or obese

Kegel exercises

Kegel exercises strengthen your pelvic floor muscles. A strong pelvic floor provides better support for your pelvic organs, prevents prolapse from worsening and relieves symptoms associated with uterine prolapse.

To perform Kegel exercises:

  • Tighten (contract) your pelvic floor muscles as though you were trying to prevent passing gas.
  • Hold the contraction for five seconds, and then relax for five seconds. If this is too difficult, start by holding for two seconds and relaxing for three seconds.
  • Work up to holding the contractions for 10 seconds at a time.
  • Aim for at least three sets of 10 repetitions each day.

Kegel exercises may be most successful when they're taught by a physical therapist and reinforced with biofeedback. Biofeedback involves using monitoring devices that help ensure you're tightening the muscles properly for the best length of time.

Once you've learned the proper method, you can do Kegel exercises discreetly just about anytime, whether you're sitting at your desk or relaxing on the couch.

Prevention

To reduce your risk of uterine prolapse, try to:

  • Perform Kegel exercises regularly. These exercises can strengthen your pelvic floor muscles — especially important after you have a baby.
  • Treat and prevent constipation. Drink plenty of fluids and eat high-fiber foods, such as fruits, vegetables, beans and whole-grain cereals.
  • Avoid heavy lifting and lift correctly. When lifting, use your legs instead of your waist or back.
  • Control coughing. Get treatment for a chronic cough or bronchitis, and don't smoke.
  • Avoid weight gain. Talk with your doctor to determine your ideal weight and get advice on weight-loss strategies, if you need them.
Aug. 02, 2017
References
  1. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  2. Ferri FF. Pelvic organ prolapse (uterine prolapse). In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 14, 2017.
  3. Rogers RG, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  4. Handa VL. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse associated with pregnancy and childbirth. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic organ prolapse (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  6. Fashokun TB, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Diagnostic evaluation. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 10, 2017.
  7. Ridgeway BM. Does prolapse equal hysterectomy? The role of uterine conservation in women with uterovaginal prolapse. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;213:802.
  8. Lobo RA, et al. Lower urinary tract function and disorders: Physiology and micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 13, 2017.
  9. Hokenstad ED, et al. Health-related quality of life and outcomes after surgical treatment of complications from vaginally placed mesh. Female Pelvic Medicine & Reproductive Surgery. 2015;21:176.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2017.