Treatment

Treatment depends on the severity of uterine prolapse. Your doctor might recommend:

  • Self-care measures. If your uterine prolapse causes few or no symptoms, simple self-care measures may provide relief or help prevent worsening prolapse. Self-care measures include performing Kegel exercises to strengthen your pelvic muscles, losing weight and treating constipation.
  • Pessary. A vaginal pessary is a plastic or rubber ring inserted into your vagina to support the bulging tissues. A pessary must be removed regularly for cleaning.

Surgery

If uterine prolapse is severe, your doctor might recommend surgery. Minimally invasive (laparoscopic) or vaginal surgery might be an option.

Surgery can involve:

  • Repair of weakened pelvic floor tissues. This surgery is generally approached through the vagina but sometimes through the abdomen. The surgeon might graft your own tissue, donor tissue or a synthetic material onto weakened pelvic floor structures to support your pelvic organs.
  • Removal of your uterus (hysterectomy). Hysterectomy might be recommended if uterine prolapse is severe.