Diagnosis

A diagnosis of uterine prolapse generally occurs during a pelvic exam.

During the pelvic exam your doctor is likely to ask you:

  • To bear down as if having a bowel movement. Bearing down can help your doctor assess how far the uterus has slipped into the vagina.
  • To tighten your pelvic muscles as if you're stopping a stream of urine. This test checks the strength of your pelvic muscles.

You might fill out a questionnaire that helps your doctor assess how uterine prolapse affects your quality of life. This information helps guide treatment decisions.

If you have severe incontinence, your doctor might recommend tests to measure how well your bladder functions (urodynamic testing).

Aug. 02, 2017
References
  1. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  2. Ferri FF. Pelvic organ prolapse (uterine prolapse). In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 14, 2017.
  3. Rogers RG, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  4. Handa VL. Urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse associated with pregnancy and childbirth. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 18, 2017.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic organ prolapse (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  6. Fashokun TB, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Diagnostic evaluation. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 10, 2017.
  7. Ridgeway BM. Does prolapse equal hysterectomy? The role of uterine conservation in women with uterovaginal prolapse. American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2015;213:802.
  8. Lobo RA, et al. Lower urinary tract function and disorders: Physiology and micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 13, 2017.
  9. Hokenstad ED, et al. Health-related quality of life and outcomes after surgical treatment of complications from vaginally placed mesh. Female Pelvic Medicine & Reproductive Surgery. 2015;21:176.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2017.