Preparing for your appointment

Your first appointment will likely be with either your primary care provider or a gynecologist. Because appointments can be brief, it's a good idea to prepare in advance for your appointment.

What you can do

  • Make a list of any symptoms you're experiencing. Include all of your symptoms, even if you don't think they're related.
  • List any medications, herbs and vitamin supplements you take. Include doses and how often you take them.
  • Have a family member or close friend accompany you, if possible. You may be given a lot of information during your visit, and it can be difficult to remember everything.
  • Take a notebook or electronic device with you. Use it to note important information during your visit.
  • Prepare a list of questions to ask your doctor. List your most important questions first, in case time runs out.

For uterine fibroids, some basic questions to ask include:

  • How many fibroids do I have? How big are they?
  • Are the fibroids located on the inside or outside of my uterus?
  • What kinds of tests might I need?
  • What medications are available to treat uterine fibroids or my symptoms?
  • What side effects can I expect from medication use?
  • Under what circumstances do you recommend surgery?
  • Will I need a medication before or after surgery?
  • Will my uterine fibroids affect my ability to become pregnant?
  • Can treatment of uterine fibroids improve my fertility?

Make sure that you understand everything your doctor tells you. Don't hesitate to have your doctor repeat information or to ask follow-up questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Some questions your doctor might ask include:

  • How often do you have these symptoms?
  • How long have you been experiencing symptoms?
  • How severe are your symptoms?
  • Do your symptoms seem to be related to your menstrual cycle?
  • Does anything improve your symptoms?
  • Does anything make your symptoms worse?
  • Do you have a family history of uterine fibroids?
July 06, 2016
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  13. Updated laparoscopic uterine power morcellation in hysterectomy and myomectomy: FDA safety communication. Food and Drug Administration. Accessed June 19, 2016.