Overview

Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child's body no longer produces an important hormone (insulin). Your child needs insulin to survive, so you'll have to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes.

The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar.

Type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care. But advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of the condition.

March 15, 2017
References
  1. Levitsky LL, et al. Epidemiology, presentation and diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 4, 2016.
  2. Kliegman RM, et al. Diabetes mellitus in children. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  4. Levitsky LL, et al. Management of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 4, 2016.
  5. Goldman L, et al., eds. Diabetes mellitus. In: Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  6. Cameron FJ, et al. Care of diabetes in children and adolescents: Controversies, changes, and consensus. The Lancet. 2015;385:2096.
  7. Jameson L, et al., eds. Management of diabetes in children. In: Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov.5, 2016.
  8. Rewers M, et al. Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes. The Lancet. 2016;387:2340.
  9. Levitsky LL, et al. Complications and screening in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 4, 2016.
  10. Chiang JL, et al. Type 1 diabetes through the life span: A position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care. 2014;37:2034.
  11. Levitsky LL, et al. Special situations in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 4, 2016.
  12. Tools for effective diabetes management. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/ndep/health-care-professionals/school-guide/Pages/publicationdetail.aspx. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  13. Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose). American Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/hyperglycemia.html. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  14. DKA (ketoacidosis) & ketones. American Diabetes Association. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/complications/ketoacidosis-dka.html. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  15. School responsibilities under federal laws. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-programs/ndep/health-care-professionals/school-guide/section4/Pages/default.aspx. Accessed Nov. 5, 2016.
  16. Buchberger B, et al. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in youth with type 1 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2016;70:70.