Traveler's diarrhea usually begins abruptly during your trip or shortly after you return home. Most cases improve within one to two days without treatment and clear up completely within a week. However, you can have multiple episodes of traveler's diarrhea during one trip.

The most common signs and symptoms of traveler's diarrhea are:

  • Abrupt onset of passage of three or more loose stools a day
  • An urgent need to defecate
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fever

Sometimes, people experience moderate to severe dehydration, persistent vomiting, a high fever, bloody stools, or severe pain in the abdomen or rectum. If you or your child experiences any of these signs or symptoms or if the diarrhea lasts longer than a few days, it's time to see a doctor.

When to see a doctor

Traveler's diarrhea usually goes away on its own within several days. Signs and symptoms may last longer and be more severe if the condition is caused by organisms other than common bacteria. In such cases, you may need prescription medications to help you get better.

If you have severe dehydration, persistent vomiting, bloody stools or a high fever, or if your symptoms last for more than a few days, seek medical help. The local embassy or consulate may help you find a well-regarded medical professional who speaks your language.

Be especially cautious with children because traveler's diarrhea can cause severe dehydration in a short time. Call a doctor if your child is sick and exhibits any of the following signs or symptoms:

  • Persistent vomiting
  • Bloody stools or severe diarrhea
  • A fever of 102 F (39 C) or more
  • Dry mouth or crying without tears
  • Signs of being unusually sleepy, drowsy or unresponsive
  • Decreased volume of urine, including fewer wet diapers in infants
Jun. 11, 2013