Preparing for your appointment

A TIA often is diagnosed in an emergency situation, but if you're concerned about your risk of having a stroke, you can prepare to discuss the subject with your doctor at your next appointment.

What you can do

If you want to discuss your risk of a stroke with your doctor, write down and be ready to discuss:

  • Your risk factors for a stroke, such as family history of strokes
  • Your medical history, including a list of all medications, as well as any vitamins or supplements, you're taking
  • Key personal information, such as lifestyle habits and major stressors
  • Whether you think you've had a TIA and what symptoms you experienced
  • Questions you might have

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may recommend that you have several tests to check your risk factors and should tell you how to prepare for the tests, such as fasting before having your blood drawn to check your cholesterol and blood sugar levels.

Aug. 16, 2017
References
  1. Daroff RB, et al. Ischemic cerebrovascular disease. In: Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  2. Transient ischemic attack information page. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/All-Disorders/Transient-Ischemic-Attack-Information-Page. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  3. Furie KL, et al. Initial evaluation and management of transient ischemic attack and minor stroke. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  4. TIA (Transient ischemic attack). American Stroke Association. http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/TypesofStroke/TIA/TIA-Transient-Ischemic-Attack_UCM_310942_Article.jsp#.WHfNHVUrJ0w. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  5. Furie KL, et al. Etiology and clinical manifestations of transient ischemic attack. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  6. Stroke risk factors. American Stroke Association. http://www.strokeassociation.org/STROKEORG/AboutStroke/UnderstandingRisk/Understanding-Risk_UCM_308539_SubHomePage.jsp. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  7. Furie KL, et al. Overview of secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  8. Shaughnessy AF. Third-generation oral contraceptives associated with greater risk of PE, Stroke, and MI. American Family Physician. 2016;94:663.
  9. Marx JA, et al., eds. Stroke. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  10. Stroke: Hope through research. https://www.ninds.nih.gov/Disorders/Patient-Caregiver-Education/Hope-Through-Research/Stroke-Hope-Through-Research. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Accessed Jan. 10, 2017.
  11. Demaerschalk BM, et al. Scientific rationale for the inclusion and exclusion criteria for intravenous alteplase in acute ischemic stroke: A statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. Stroke. 2016;47:581.
  12. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 31, 2016.
  13. Swanson JW (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 13, 2017.