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Oct. 04, 2016
References
  1. Feldman M, et al. Hepatic drug metabolism and liver disease caused by drugs. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  2. Couturier FJ, et al. Toxic hepatitis due to a food supplement: "Natural" is no synonym for "harmless." Clinics and Research in Hepatology and Gastroenterology. In press. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  3. McNally PR, ed. Alcoholic liver disease, alcoholism, and alcohol withdrawal. In: GI/Liver Secrets Plus. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  4. Larson AM. Drug-induced liver injury. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  5. Larson AM. Hepatotoxicity due to herbal medications and dietary supplements. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  6. Brown, AC. Liver toxicity related to herbs and dietary supplements: Online table of case reports. Part 3 of 6, Food and Chemical Toxicology. In press. Accessed Aug. 20, 2016.
  7. Feldman M, et al. Liver disease caused by anesthetics, chemicals, toxins, and herbal preparations. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  8. Picco MF (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Aug. 29, 2016.