Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

You can help manage your thalassemia by following your treatment plan and adopting healthy-living habits. The following tips will help:

  • Avoid excess iron. Unless your doctor recommends it, don't take vitamins or other supplements that contain iron.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Eating a balanced diet that contains plenty of nutritious foods can help you feel better and boost your energy. Your doctor also may recommend you take a folic acid supplement to help your body make new red blood cells. Also, to keep your bones healthy, make sure your diet contains adequate calcium and vitamin D. Ask your doctor what the right amounts are for you and whether you need to take a supplement.
  • Avoid infections. Protect yourself from infections with frequent hand-washing and by avoiding sick people. This is especially important if you've had to have your spleen removed. You'll also need an annual flu shot, as well as the meningitis, pneumococcal and hepatitis B vaccines to prevent infections. If you develop a fever or other signs and symptoms of an infection, see your doctor for treatment.

Coping and support

Coping with thalassemia can be challenging. But you don't have to do it alone. If you have questions or would like guidance, talk with a member of your health care team. You may also benefit from joining a support group. Such a group can provide both sympathetic listening and useful information. To find out about support groups in your area that deal with thalassemia, ask a member of your health care team.

Prevention

In most cases, you can't prevent thalassemia. If you have thalassemia, or if you carry a thalassemia gene, consider talking with a genetic counselor for guidance if you're thinking of having children.