Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

If your swollen lymph nodes are tender or painful, you might get some relief by doing the following:

  • Apply a warm compress. Apply a warm, wet compress, such as a washcloth dipped in hot water and wrung out, to the affected area.
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. These include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, others). Use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.
  • Get adequate rest. You often need rest to aid your recovery from the underlying condition.
Oct. 26, 2016
References
  1. Longo DL, et al., eds. Enlargement of lymph nodes and spleen. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2015. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  2. Fletcher RH. Evaluation of peripheral lymphadenopathy in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  3. Lymphadenitis. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/dermatologic_disorders/bacterial_skin_infections/lymphadenitis.html. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  4. Motyckova G, et al. Why does my patient have lymphadenopathy or splenomegaly? Hematology and Oncology Clinics of North America. 2012;26:395.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Lymphadenopathy. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, Rochester, Minn.; 2016.
  6. Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary. 32nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: W.B. Saunders; 2011. http://dorlands.com/index.jsp. Accessed July 25, 2016.
  7. Litin SC (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 27, 2016.