Stomach cancer care at Mayo Clinic

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Mayo Clinic experts in oncology, gastroesophageal junction cancer and other cancers of the digestive system are equipped with the knowledge and resources to provide you with exactly the care you need.

Mayo Clinic Connect: Cancer

Your Mayo Clinic care team

At Mayo Clinic, medical oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiation oncologists, general surgeons, thoracic surgeons, pathologists and pharmacologists work as a multidisciplinary team to provide comprehensive care for those with gastroesophageal cancer and stomach cancer. Other professionals who may be involved in your care are:

  • Dietitians
  • Medical geneticists
  • Occupational therapists
  • Palliative care experts
  • Pharmacologists
  • Physical therapists
  • Social workers

Advanced diagnosis and treatment

Mayo Clinic doctors will work with you to review your treatment options and develop a treatment plan that best suits your needs and goals.

The range of treatments offered to people with stomach cancer or gastroesophageal junction cancer includes targeted therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and many types of surgical procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, esophagectomy, subtotal gastrectomy and total gastrectomy.

Proton beam therapy, one of the newest radiation therapies available at Mayo Clinic in the Rochester and Phoenix locations, uses a highly targeted precision beam to treat cancers located close to critical organs and body structures. Mayo Clinic's Proton beam therapy program features intensity-modulated proton beam therapy with pencil beam scanning, which allows radiation oncologists to destroy cancer while sparing healthy tissue.

Nationally recognized expertise

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Mayo Clinic has extensive experience treating gastroesophageal junction cancer and stomach cancer. The three Mayo Clinic campuses combined treat about 450 patients with gastroesophageal junction cancer or stomach cancer each year.

Mayo Clinic Cancer Center meets strict standards for a National Cancer Institute comprehensive cancer center, which recognizes scientific excellence and a multidisciplinary approach to cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., and Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for cancer by U.S. News & World Report.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for digestive disorders in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for digestive disorders by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among the Best Children's Hospitals for digestive disorders.

Aug. 19, 2017
References
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  2. Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Cancer of the stomach and gastroesophageal junction. In: Abeloff 's Clinical Oncology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2014. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 23, 2016.
  3. Feldman M, et al. Adenocarcinoma of the stomach and other gastric tumors. In: Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed March 23, 2016.
  4. Gastric cancer. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed March 23, 2016.
  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors treatment — Patient version (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. http://www.cancer.gov/types/soft-tissue-sarcoma/patient/gist-treatment-pdq. Accessed March 24, 2016.
  6. Palliative care. Fort Washington, Pa.: National Comprehensive Cancer Network. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp. Accessed March 23, 2016.
  7. Singh S, et al. Physical activity is associated with reduced risk of gastric cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Cancer Prevention Research. 2014;7:12.
  8. Carr JS, et al. Risk factors for rising incidence of esophageal and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer. 2013;44:143.
  9. Atasoy A, et al. Multimodality approaches to potentially resectable esophagogastric junction and gastric cardia adenocarcinomas. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 26, 2017.
  10. Goode EF, et al. Immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2016;5:84.
  11. Crane SJ, et al. Subsite-specific risk factors for esophageal and gastric adenocarcinoma. American Journal of Gastroenterology. 2007;102:1596.
  12. Ajanai JA, et al. Esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancers, version 1.2015. Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 2015;13:194.
  13. Maron SB, et al. Novel targeted therapies for esophagogastric cancer. Surgical Oncology Clinics of North America. 2017;26:293.