Clinical trials

Part of Mayo Clinic's commitment to its patients involves conducting medical research that helps people live longer, healthier lives. Clinical trials are research studies that involve volunteer participants. These human studies help doctors better understand diagnose, treat, and prevent diseases or conditions.

Mayo Clinic has thousands of active clinical trials and research studies; and coordinates national clinical trials with other medical centers. See Mayo's clinical trials website and search for a study by condition, treatment or drug name.

Mayo Clinic researchers continually develop new studies, so ask your health care provider about clinical studies or visit to learn about additional research opportunities.

May 18, 2016
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