Preparing for your appointment

If you're having pain, seek emergency care. If you detect a scrotal mass, you'll probably start by seeing your family doctor. You might be referred to a specialist in urinary tract and male genital disorders (urologist).

Preparing for your or your child's appointment with your doctor or a urologist will help you make the most of your time with the doctor.

What you can do

Write down information to share with your doctor, including:

  • Symptoms you're experiencing, including any that may seem unrelated to a scrotal mass
  • Key personal information, including major stresses or recent life changes
  • Medications, vitamins and supplements you're taking
  • Family history of testicular cancer or other disorders of the scrotum
  • Personal medical history, including previous scrotal masses, undescended testicle or congenital defects related to the genitals
  • Questions to ask your doctor

Questions about scrotal masses might include:

  • What tests will I need?
  • How long will it take to get the test results?
  • If the scrotal mass is cancerous (malignant), what are the next steps?
  • If the scrotal mass isn't cancerous, will I need treatment?
  • Are there brochures or other printed material that I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

Don't hesitate to ask any other questions.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • When did you discover a lump or experience other symptoms associated with a scrotal mass?
  • Are you having or have you had pain in or near your scrotum?
  • Have you had fever or blood or pus in your urine?
  • Have you had a recent injury to the groin?
  • Does anything, such as pain medication, improve your symptoms?
  • Does anything worsen symptoms, such as exercise or exertion that puts a strain on the groin?
  • Did you have an undescended or retractile testicle that was corrected with surgery?
  • Have you ever had a sexually transmitted infection?
  • Do you have multiple sex partners or a new sex partner?
May 18, 2017
References
  1. O'Connell T. Scrotal masses. In: Instant Work-ups: A Clinical Guide to Medicine. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Scrotal mass. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Education and Research; 2016.
  3. Brenner JS, et al. Causes of scrotal pain in children and adolescents. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  4. Crawford P, et al. Evaluation of scrotal masses. American Family Physician. 2014;89:723. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/0501/p723.html. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  5. Adam A, et al., eds. Male genitourinary tract. In: Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2015. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  6. Marx JA, et al., eds. Genitourinary and renal tract disorders. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  7. Eyre RC. Evaluation of nonacute scrotal pathology in adult men. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  8. Treating testicular cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicular-cancer/treating.html. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  9. Do I have testicular cancer? American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicular-cancer/do-i-have-testicular-cancer.html. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
  10. Castle EP (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. March 7, 2017.