Diagnosis

Your doctor will rely on a number of factors to diagnose a scrotal mass. These may include:

  • A physical exam. Your doctor will feel your scrotum, its contents and nearby areas of the groin while you're standing and lying down.
  • Transillumination. Shining a bright light through the scrotum might provide information about the size, location and makeup of a scrotal mass.
  • Ultrasound. Using sound waves to create an image of internal organs, this test can provide detailed information about the size, location and makeup of a scrotal mass, as well as the condition of the testicles. An ultrasound usually is necessary to diagnose a scrotal mass.
  • Urine test. Laboratory tests of a sample of urine might detect a bacterial or viral infection or the presence of blood or pus in the urine.
  • Blood test. Laboratory tests of a blood sample might detect a bacterial or viral infection or elevated levels of certain proteins that are associated with testicular cancer.
  • Computerized tomography (CT) scan. If other tests indicate testicular cancer, you'll likely undergo a specialized X-ray exam (CT scan) of your chest, abdomen and groin to see if cancer has spread to other tissues or organs.
May 18, 2017
References
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  2. AskMayoExpert. Scrotal mass. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Education and Research; 2016.
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  8. Treating testicular cancer. American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicular-cancer/treating.html. Accessed Feb. 26, 2017.
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