Tests and diagnosis

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Your doctor will rely on a number of factors to diagnose a scrotal mass. These may include:

  • A physical exam. Your doctor will examine the scrotum by carefully feeling (palpating) the scrotum, its contents and nearby areas of the groin.
  • Transillumination. Shining a bright light through the scrotum may provide preliminary information about the size, location and makeup of a scrotal mass.
  • Ultrasound. An ultrasound test uses sound waves to create an image of internal organs. This test can provide detailed information about the size, location and makeup of a scrotal mass, as well as the condition of the testicles. In most cases, an ultrasound is a necessary tool to diagnose a scrotal mass.
  • Urine test. Laboratory tests of a sample of urine may detect a bacterial or viral infection or the presence of blood or pus in the urine.
  • Blood test. Laboratory tests of a blood sample may detect a bacterial or viral infection or elevated levels of certain proteins that are associated with testicular cancer.
  • Computerized tomography (CT) scan. If other tests have indicated testicular cancer, you'll likely undergo a specialized X-ray exam (CT scan) of your chest, abdomen and groin to see if cancer has spread to other tissues or organs (metastasized).
Jul. 14, 2011