Resources

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Oct. 06, 2016
References
  1. LoVecchio F. Scorpion stings in the United States and Mexico. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  2. Bawaskar HS, et al. Scorpion sting update. Journal of the Association of Physicians of India. 2012;60:46.
  3. Scorpions. Arizona Cooperative Extension. University of Arizona. http://extension.arizona.edu/sites/extension.arizona.edu/files/pubs/az1223.pdf. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  4. Antidote relieves scorpion stings. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. www.fda.gov/consumer. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  5. What to do in a medical emergency: Bites and stings. American College of Emergency Physicians Foundation. http://www.emergencycareforyou.org/Emergency-101/Emergencies-A-Z/Bites-and-Stings/. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  6. Marx JA, et al., eds. Venomous animal injuries. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  7. Markovchick VJ, et al. Bites and stings. In: Emergency Medicine Secrets. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016.
  8. Spiders and scorpions. Merck Veterinary Manual. http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/toxicology/venomous_arthropods/spiders_and_scorpions.html. Accessed July 18, 2016.
  9. Wilkinson JM (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 31, 2016.
  10. Isbister GK, et al. Scorpion envenomation. New England Journal of Medicine. 2014;371:457.
  11. Megarbane B, et al. Scorpion envenomation. New England Journal of Medicine. 2014;371:1557.