Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to start by seeing your family doctor or a general practitioner. Or when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred to a skin disease specialist (dermatologist). If your condition affects your eyes, you may be referred to an eye specialist (ophthalmologist).

It's a good idea to prepare for your appointment. Here's some information to help you.

What you can do

Preparing a list of questions will help you make the most of your appointment time. For rosacea, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What might be causing the signs and symptoms?
  • Do I need tests to confirm the diagnosis?
  • What is the best treatment?
  • Is this condition temporary or chronic?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • I have other medical problems; how can I manage them together?
  • Can I wait to see if the condition resolves on its own?
  • What are the alternatives to the approach that you're suggesting?
  • What skin care routines do you recommend I use?

Don't hesitate to ask any other questions that come up during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you several questions, including:

  • When did you begin experiencing symptoms?
  • How often do you experience these symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • What, if anything, seems to improve your symptoms?
  • What, if anything, appears to trigger or worsen your symptoms?
Aug. 18, 2016
References
  1. Goldsmith LA, et al., eds. Rosacea. In: Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine. 8th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2012. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  2. Habif TP. Acne, rosacea, and related disorders. In: Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy. 6th ed. Edinburgh, U.K.; New York, N.Y.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  3. Dahl MV. Rosacea: Pathogenesis, clinical features and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  4. Ferri FF. Rosacea. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  5. Maier LE. Management of rosacea. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 5, 2013.
  6. AskMayoExpert. Rosacea. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  7. van Zuuren EJ, et al. Interventions for rosacea. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. http://ovidsp.tx.ovid.com/sp-3.20.0b/ovidweb.cgi. Accessed June 23, 2016.
  8. Fowler J, et al. Once-daily topical brimonidine tartrate gel 0·5% is a novel treatment for moderate to severe facial erythema of rosacea: Results of two multicentre, randomized and vehicle-controlled studies. British Journal of Dermatology. 2012;1663:633.
  9. Aldrich N, et al. Genetic vs environmental factors that correlate with rosacea: A cohort-based survey of twins. JAMA Dermatology. 2015;151:1213.
  10. Questions and answers about rosacea. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. http://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Rosacea/default.asp. Accessed March 31, 2015.
  11. Isotretinoin: Drug information. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 20, 2016.
  12. Colloidal silver. www.naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed June 24, 2016.
  13. Emu oil. www.naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed June 24, 2016.
  14. Laurelwood. www.naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed June 24, 2016.
  15. Oregano oil. www.naturaldatabase.therapeuticresearch.com. Accessed June 24, 2016.
  16. Gibson LG (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. July 12, 2016.