Preparing for your appointment

Your family doctor or a skin specialist (dermatologist) can diagnose ringworm of the body. Here are some tips to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Your time with your doctor is limited, so preparing a list of questions helps you make the most of your appointment. List your questions from most important to least important in case time runs out. For ringworm, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What might be causing the signs and symptoms?
  • Are tests needed to confirm the diagnosis?
  • What is the best treatment?
  • Is this condition temporary or chronic?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing?
  • Can I wait to see if the condition goes away on its own?
  • What can I do to prevent the infection from spreading?
  • What skin care routines do you recommend while the condition heals?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you first notice your symptoms?
  • What did the rash look like when it first started?
  • Have you had this type of rash in the past?
  • Does a pet or family member already have ringworm?
  • Is the rash painful or itchy?
  • Have you used any medications on it already? If so, what?
Aug. 02, 2016
References
  1. Allmon A, et al. Common skin rashes in children. American Family Physician. 2015;92:211.
  2. Ferri FF. Tinea corporis. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 29, 2016.
  3. Bennett JE, et al. Dermatophytosis (ringworm) and other superficial mycoses. In: Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 29, 2016.
  4. Kliegman RM, et al. Cutaneous fungal infections. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 29, 2016.
  5. Goldstein AO, et al. Dermatophyte (tinea) infections. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed June 29, 2016.
  6. Patterson JW. Mycoses and algal infections. In: Weedon's Skin Pathology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Limited; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed June 29, 2016.
  7. Kaushik N, et al. Superficial fungal infections. Primary Care Clinics in Office Practice. 2015;42:501.
  8. Ringworm risk and prevention. Centers for Disease Control. http://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/ringworm/risk-prevention.html. Accessed July 1, 2016.