Treatment

Treatment depends on the severity of the posterior vaginal prolapse. Your doctor might recommend:

  • Observation. If your posterior vaginal prolapse causes few or no symptoms, simple self-care measures — such as performing Kegel exercises to strengthen your pelvic muscles — may provide relief.
  • Pessary. A vaginal pessary is a plastic or rubber ring inserted into your vagina to support the bulging tissues. A pessary must be removed regularly for cleaning.

Surgery

Surgical repair might be needed if:

  • The posterior vaginal prolapse protrudes outside your vagina and is especially bothersome.
  • You have prolapse of other pelvic organs in addition to posterior vaginal prolapse that is bothersome. Surgical repair for each condition can be completed at the same time.

The surgery uses a vaginal approach and usually consists of removing excess, stretched tissue that forms the posterior vaginal prolapse. A mesh patch might be inserted to support and strengthen the fascia.

Aug. 02, 2017
References
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