Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a gynecologist.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

  • List symptoms you've been having, and for how long.
  • List all medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including the doses.
  • List key personal and medical information, including other conditions, recent life changes and stressors.
  • Prepare questions to ask your doctor.

For posterior vaginal prolapse, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What can I do at home to ease my symptoms?
  • Should I restrict any activities?
  • What are the chances that the bulge will grow if I don't do anything?
  • What treatment approach do you recommend?
  • What's the likelihood that the posterior vaginal prolapse will recur if I have it surgically treated?
  • What are the risks of surgery?

During your appointment, don't hesitate to ask other questions as they occur to you.

What to expect from your health care provider

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, including:

  • What symptoms are you experiencing?
  • When did you first notice your symptoms? Have they worsened over time?
  • Do you have pelvic pain?
  • Do you ever leak urine?
  • Have you had a severe or ongoing cough?
  • Do you do any heavy lifting in your job or daily activities?
  • Do you strain during bowel movements?
  • Has anyone in your family ever had posterior vaginal prolapse or any other pelvic problems?
  • How many children have you given birth to? Were your deliveries vaginal?
  • Do you plan to have children in the future?
Aug. 02, 2017
References
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  2. Rogers RG, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  3. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic organ prolapse (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  5. Townsend CM Jr, et al. Colon and rectum. In: Sabiston Textbook of Surgery: The Biological Basis of Modern Surgical Practice. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  6. Hale DS, et al. Consistently inconsistent, the posterior vaginal wall. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2016;214:314.
  7. Park AJ, et al. Surgical management of posterior vaginal defects. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  8. Lobo RA, et al. Lower urinary tract function and disorders: Physiology and micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 13, 2017.
  9. Warner K. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 5, 2017.