Diagnosis

A diagnosis of posterior vaginal prolapse generally occurs during a pelvic exam of your vagina and rectum.

During the pelvic exam your doctor is likely to ask you:

  • To bear down as if having a bowel movement. Bearing down may cause the posterior vaginal prolapse to bulge, so your doctor can assess its size and location.
  • To tighten your pelvic muscles as if you're stopping a stream of urine. This test checks the strength of your pelvic muscles.

You might fill out a questionnaire that helps your doctor assess how far the bulge extends into your vagina and how much it affects your quality of life. This information helps guide treatment decisions.

Rarely, your doctor might recommend imaging tests:

  • MRI or an X-ray can determine the size of the tissue bulge
  • Defecography can determine how efficiently your rectum empties
Aug. 02, 2017
References
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  2. Rogers RG, et al. Pelvic organ prolapse in women: Epidemiology, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and management. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  3. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 12, 2017.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Pelvic organ prolapse (adult). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
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  8. Lobo RA, et al. Lower urinary tract function and disorders: Physiology and micturition, voiding dysfunction, urinary incontinence, urinary tract infections, and painful bladder syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 13, 2017.
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