Lifestyle and home remedies

By Mayo Clinic Staff

A variety of steps can decrease Raynaud's attacks and help you feel better.

  • Don't smoke. Smoking causes skin temperature to drop by constricting blood vessels, which may lead to an attack. Inhaling secondhand smoke also can aggravate Raynaud's.
  • Exercise. Exercise can increase circulation, among other health benefits. If you have secondary Raynaud's, talk to your doctor before exercising outdoors in the cold.
  • Control stress. Learning to recognize and avoid stressful situations may help control the number of attacks.
  • Avoid rapidly changing temperatures. Try not to move from a hot environment to an air-conditioned room. If possible, avoid frozen-food sections of grocery stores.

During an attack: What should you do?

First, warm your hands, feet or other affected areas. To gently warm your fingers and toes:

  • Get indoors or to a warmer area
  • Wiggle your fingers and toes
  • Place hands under armpits
  • Make wide circles (windmills) with your arms
  • Run warm — not hot — water over your fingers and toes
  • Massage your hands and feet

If stress triggers an attack, get out of the stressful situation and relax. Practice a stress-reduction technique that works for you, and warm your hands or feet in water to help lessen the attack.

Oct. 07, 2014

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