You normally lose about 10 cups (2.4 liters) of water every day — much more during exercise or illness. Learn how to stay hydrated.

Infant jaundice

Infant jaundice, a yellowing of the skin and eyes, is common after birth. Careful monitoring and treatment is important for preventing rare, but serious, complications.


Nausea and vomiting

Unexplained weight loss

Tests and diagnosis


Nov. 24, 2015
  1. Kliegman RA, et al. Pyloric stenosis and other congenital anomalies of the stomach. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  2. Olive AP, et al. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  3. Delaney CP, ed. Pyloromyotomy for pyloric stenosis. In: Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  4. Odze RD, et al., eds. Neuromuscular disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In: Odze and Goldblum Surgical Pathology of the GI Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract, and Pancreas. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Suspected pyloric stenosis (pediatric). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.
  6. Davies BW. The vomiting infant: Pyloric stenosis. Surgery. 2013;31:622.