Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in treating digestive disorders (gastroenterologist) or to a pediatric surgeon.

What you can do

  • Write down your baby's symptoms, including when and how often your baby vomits, whether the vomit is forcefully projected, and if the vomit appears to be most or just part what the baby has eaten.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What's the most likely cause of my baby's symptoms?
  • What tests does my baby need? Do they require any special preparation?
  • What treatments are available? Does my baby need surgery?
  • Will there be any feeding restrictions after surgery?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may leave time to go over points you want to spend more time on. You may be asked:

  • When did your baby first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Are the symptoms continuous or occasional? Do they occur only after eating?
  • Does your baby seem hungry after vomiting?
  • Does the vomit come out forcefully?
  • Does your baby have four or more wet diapers a day?
  • Is there blood in your baby's stool?
  • What was your baby's last recorded weight?
Nov. 24, 2015
  1. Kliegman RA, et al. Pyloric stenosis and other congenital anomalies of the stomach. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  2. Olive AP, et al. Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  3. Delaney CP, ed. Pyloromyotomy for pyloric stenosis. In: Netter's Surgical Anatomy and Approaches. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  4. Odze RD, et al., eds. Neuromuscular disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. In: Odze and Goldblum Surgical Pathology of the GI Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract, and Pancreas. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. Accessed Sept. 20, 2015.
  5. AskMayoExpert. Suspected pyloric stenosis (pediatric). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research.
  6. Davies BW. The vomiting infant: Pyloric stenosis. Surgery. 2013;31:622.