Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic Staff

There's no cure for pseudogout, but a combination of treatments can help relieve pain and improve the joint's function.

Medications

If over-the-counter pain relievers aren't enough, your doctor may suggest:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Prescription strength NSAIDs include naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others) and indomethacin (Indocin). NSAIDs can cause stomach bleeding and decreased kidney function, especially in older adults.
  • Colchicine (Colcrys). Low-dose pills of this gout drug are also effective for pseudogout. If you have frequent episodes of pseudogout, your doctor may recommend that you take colchicine daily as a preventive measure.
  • Corticosteroids. If you can't take NSAIDs or colchicine, your doctor may suggest taking corticosteroid pills, such as prednisone, to reduce inflammation and terminate the attack. Long-term use of corticosteroids can cause bone weakening, cataracts, diabetes and weight gain.

Joint drainage

To relieve pain and pressure in an affected joint, your doctor inserts a needle and removes some of the joint fluid. This also helps remove some of the crystals from the joint. The doctor will then inject the joint with a numbing medication and a corticosteroid to decrease inflammation.

Jul. 27, 2012

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