Treatment

Although there is no cure for progressive supranuclear palsy, treatments are available to help ease symptoms of the disorder. The options include:

  • Parkinson's disease medications, which increase levels of a brain chemical involved in smooth, controlled muscle movements (dopamine). The effectiveness of these medications is limited and usually temporary, lasting about two to three years.
  • Onabotulinumtoxin type A (Botox), which may be injected in small doses into the muscles around your eyes. Botox blocks the chemical signals that cause muscles to contract, which can improve eyelid spasms.
  • Eyeglasses with bifocal or prism lenses, which may help ease problems with looking downward.
  • Speech and swallowing evaluations, to help you learn safer swallowing techniques.
  • Physical therapy and occupational therapy, to improve balance.

Researchers are working to develop medication to treat progressive supranuclear palsy, including therapies that may block the formation of tau.

April 13, 2017
References
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