Preparing for your appointment

You may be referred to a doctor who specializes in disorders of the brain and nervous system (neurologist).

What you can do

  • Write down your symptoms, including any that may seem unrelated to the reason why you scheduled the appointment.
  • Make a list of all your medications, vitamins and supplements.
  • Write down your key medical information, including other conditions.
  • Write down key personal information, including any recent changes or stressors in your life.
  • Write down questions to ask your doctor.
  • Ask a relative or friend to accompany you, to help you remember what the doctor says.

Questions to ask your doctor

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • How does progressive supranuclear palsy usually progress?
  • What treatments are available, and what types of side effects can I expect?
  • I have other health conditions. How can I best manage these conditions together?
  • Should I restrict my activities?

In addition to the questions that you've prepared to ask your doctor, don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment.

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions. Being ready to answer them may make time to go over points you want to spend more time on. You may be asked:

  • Have you experienced problems with balance or walking?
  • Do you find it difficult to see items below you, such as the plate when you are eating?
  • Do you have trouble speaking or swallowing?
  • Have your movements felt stiff or shaky?
  • Have you experienced any troubling mood changes?
  • When did you begin experiencing these symptoms? Have they been continuous or occasional?
  • Does anything seem to improve or worsen these symptoms?
April 13, 2017
References
  1. Factor SA. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  2. Progressive supranuclear palsy fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/psp/detail_psp.htm. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy. The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. https://www.theaftd.org/understandingftd/disorders/psp. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  4. Colosimo C, et al. Fifty years of progressive supranuclear palsy. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2014;85:938.
  5. Kim JH, et al. Communication impairments in people with progressive supranuclear palsy: A tutorial. Journal of Communication Disorders. 2015;56:76.
  6. Ferri FF. Progressive supranuclear palsy. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  7. Fukui Y, et al. Differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease by MRI-based dynamic cerebrospinal fluid flow. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2015;357:178.
  8. Rusz J, et al. Speech disorders reflect differing pathophysiology in Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy. Journal of Neurology. 2015;262:992.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Parkinson disease: Physical medicine and rehabilitation. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  10. A guide for people living with PSP, CBD, and other atypical Parkinsonian disorders. CurePSP. http://www.psp.org . Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  11. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 27, 2016.
  12. Owens E, et al. Highly specific radiographic marker predates clinical diagnosis in progressive supranuclear palsy. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders. 2016;28:107.
  13. Whitwell JL, et al. [18F]AV-1451 Tau positron emission tomography in progressive supranuclear palsy. Movement Disorders. In press. Accessed Nov. 26, 2016.
  14. Josephs KA. Key emerging issues in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Journal of Neurology. 2015;262:783.