Expertise and rankings

  • Team approach. Specialists trained in neurology, speech pathology and movement disorders work together to diagnose and treat people with progressive supranuclear palsy at Mayo Clinic.
  • Clinical experience. Progressive supranuclear palsy is very rare, affecting only three to six people in every 100,000 worldwide. Mayo Clinic doctors treat more than 400 people every year with this uncommon condition.
  • Advanced diagnosis. Mayo Clinic researchers discovered that some people with progressive supranuclear palsy develop speech problems (apraxia of speech) years before experiencing other symptoms. This speech problem may be the first sign of progressive supranuclear palsy. Mayo Clinic doctors also use specialized MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to diagnose progressive supranuclear palsy.
  • Research leader. Mayo Clinic researchers are working to improve diagnosis and treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Specific efforts involve mapping changes in the brains of people with the condition, comparing familial and sporadic cases, using imaging to predict disease progression and to pinpoint diagnosis, and looking for environmental and genetic factors that may be associated with the condition.

    Mayo Clinic also has one of the largest progressive supranuclear palsy brain banks in the world.

Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for neurology and neurosurgery in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz., and Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Fla., are ranked among the Best Hospitals for neurology and neurosurgery by U.S. News & World Report.

April 13, 2017
References
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  2. Progressive supranuclear palsy fact sheet. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/psp/detail_psp.htm. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy. The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration. https://www.theaftd.org/understandingftd/disorders/psp. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  4. Colosimo C, et al. Fifty years of progressive supranuclear palsy. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry. 2014;85:938.
  5. Kim JH, et al. Communication impairments in people with progressive supranuclear palsy: A tutorial. Journal of Communication Disorders. 2015;56:76.
  6. Ferri FF. Progressive supranuclear palsy. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  7. Fukui Y, et al. Differentiating progressive supranuclear palsy from Parkinson's disease by MRI-based dynamic cerebrospinal fluid flow. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2015;357:178.
  8. Rusz J, et al. Speech disorders reflect differing pathophysiology in Parkinson's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy and multiple system atrophy. Journal of Neurology. 2015;262:992.
  9. AskMayoExpert. Parkinson disease: Physical medicine and rehabilitation. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  10. A guide for people living with PSP, CBD, and other atypical Parkinsonian disorders. CurePSP. http://www.psp.org . Accessed Nov. 22, 2016.
  11. Riggin EA. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Oct. 27, 2016.
  12. Owens E, et al. Highly specific radiographic marker predates clinical diagnosis in progressive supranuclear palsy. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders. 2016;28:107.
  13. Whitwell JL, et al. [18F]AV-1451 Tau positron emission tomography in progressive supranuclear palsy. Movement Disorders. In press. Accessed Nov. 26, 2016.
  14. Josephs KA. Key emerging issues in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Journal of Neurology. 2015;262:783.