Treatment

Primary progressive aphasia can't be cured, and there are no medications to treat it. However, some therapies might help improve or maintain your ability to communicate and manage your condition.

Speech and language therapy

Working with a speech-language pathologist, focusing primarily on efforts to compensate for eroding language skills, can be helpful. Although speech and language therapy hasn't been proved to slow progression of the condition, it can help you manage your condition.

Jan. 05, 2016
References
  1. Primary progressive aphasia. National Aphasia Association. http://www.aphasia.org/aphasia-resources/primary-progressive-aphasia/. Accessed Oct. 18, 2015.
  2. Lee SE, et al. Frontotemporal dementia: Clinical features and diagnosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Oct. 18, 2015.
  3. Leger GC, et al. A review on primary progressive aphasia. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. 2007;3:745.
  4. Kirshner HS. Frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia, a review. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. 2014;10:1045.
  5. Mesulam M, et al. Primary progressive aphasia and the evolving neurology of the language network. Nature Reviews Neurology. 2014;10:554.
  6. Rogalski EJ, et al. Association between the prevalence of learning disabilities and primary progressive aphasia. JAMA Neurology. 2014;71:1576.
  7. Masulam M. Primary progressive aphasia. Dementia & Neuropsychologia. 2013;7:2.
  8. Family adjustment to aphasia. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. http://www.asha.org/public/speech/disorders/FamilyAdjustmentAphasia/. Accessed Oct. 20, 2015.