Primary progressive aphasia symptoms may vary by individual, depending on which portion of the brain's language center is involved.

Primary progressive aphasia has three types, which cause different symptoms.

Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty comprehending spoken or written language, particularly single words
  • Difficulty comprehending word meanings
  • Difficulty naming objects

Lopogenic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty retrieving correct words in speech
  • Frequent pauses in your speech while searching for words
  • Slow speech
  • Difficulty repeating phrases or sentences

Nonfluent-agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty speaking
  • Hesitant, halting speech
  • Making errors in speech sounds
  • Difficulty understanding sentences
  • Using grammar incorrectly

Symptoms may vary depending on the speaking situation and the type of primary progressive aphasia. For example, a person may need to pause frequently to find words during a conversation requiring a high level of precision but then have no pauses when exchanging small talk. Reading and writing also are usually affected.

Jan. 16, 2013

You Are ... The Campaign for Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization. Make a difference today.