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Nov. 02, 2016
References
  1. Ferri FF. Aldosteronism. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2017. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Primary aldosteronism. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  3. Young WF. Pathophysiology and clinical features of primary aldosteronism. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  4. Young WF. Diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  5. Young WF. Treatment of primary aldosteronism. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  6. Primary aldosteronism. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/endocrine-and-metabolic-disorders/adrenal-disorders/primary-aldosteronism. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  7. Description of high blood pressure. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  8. Mount DB. Clinical manifestations and treatment of hypokalemia. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  9. Nwariaku F. Adrenalectomy: Minimally invasive surgery and traditional open procedures. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  10. Longo DL, et al., eds. Hypertensive vascular disease. In: Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. 19th ed. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill Education; 2015. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 17, 2016.
  11. Nippoldt TB (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Aug. 25, 2016.