Preparing for your appointment

If you have signs or symptoms of miscarriage, contact your health care provider right away. Depending on the circumstances, you might need immediate medical care.

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment, and what to expect from your health care provider.

What you can do

Before your appointment, you might want to:

  • Ask about pre-appointment restrictions. In most cases you'll be seen immediately. If that's not the case, ask whether you should restrict your activities while you wait for your appointment.
  • Find a loved one or friend who can join you for your appointment. Fear and anxiety might make it difficult to focus on what your health care provider says. Take someone along who can help remember all the information.
  • Write down questions to ask your health care provider. That way, you won't forget anything important that you want to ask, and you can make the most of your time with your health care provider.

Below are some basic questions to ask your health care provider about miscarriage:

  • What are the treatment options?
  • What kinds of tests do I need?
  • Can I continue to do my usual activities?
  • What signs or symptoms should prompt me to call you or go to the hospital?
  • Do you know what caused my miscarriage?
  • What are my chances for a successful future pregnancy?

In addition to the questions you've prepared, don't hesitate to ask other questions during your appointment — especially if you need clarification or you don't understand something.

What to expect from your doctor

Your health care provider is likely to ask you a number of questions, too. For example:

  • When was your last menstrual period?
  • Were you using any contraceptive methods at the time you likely conceived?
  • When did you first notice your signs or symptoms?
  • Have your symptoms been continuous or occasional?
  • Compared with your heaviest days of menstrual flow, is your bleeding more, less or about the same?
  • Have you had a miscarriage before?
  • Have you had any complications during a previous pregnancy?
  • Do you have any other health conditions?
  • Do you know your blood type?
July 20, 2016
References
  1. Tulandi T, et al. Spontaneous abortion: Risk factors, etiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  2. Strand EA. Increasing the management options for early pregnancy loss: The economics of miscarriage. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015;212:125.
  3. Robinson GA. Pregnancy loss. Best Practice & Research: Clinical Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 2014;28:169.
  4. Ferri FF. Spontaneous miscarriage. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  5. Rink BD, et al. Recurrent pregnancy loss. In: Creasy and Resnik's Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Principles and Practice. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  6. Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). https://www.clinicalkey.com/#!/content/nice_guidelines/65-s2.0-QS69. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  7. Marx JA, et al., eds. Acute complications of pregnancy. In: Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  8. Tulandi T, et al. Definition and etiology of recurrent pregnancy loss. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  9. Tulandi T, et al. Evaluation of couples with recurrent pregnancy loss. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  10. Septic abortion. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/gynecology-and-obstetrics/abnormalities-of-pregnancy/septic-abortion. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  11. Tulandi T, et al. Spontaneous abortion: Management. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  12. Pregnancy loss. American Family Physician. 2012;85:905.
  13. What is recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL)? American Society for Reproductive Medicine. https://www.asrm.org/uploadedFiles/ASRM_Content/Resources/Patient_Resources/Fact_Sheets_and_Info_Booklets/recurrent_preg_loss.pdf. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  14. Huffman CS, et al. Couples and miscarriage: The influence of gender and reproductive factors on the impact of miscarriage. Women's Health Issues, 2015;25:570.
  15. Para A, et al. Exercise and pregnancy loss. American Family Physician. 2015;91:437. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  16. Moscrop A. Can sex during pregnancy cause a miscarriage? A concise history of not knowing. British Journal of General Practice. 2012;62:e308. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310038/. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  17. Risk factors for miscarriage from a prevention perspective: A nationwide follow-up study. BJOG: An international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology. 2014;121:1375. https://www.clinicalkey.com/#!/content/medline/2-s2.0-24548778. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  18. Louis GMB, et al. Lifestyle and pregnancy loss in a cohort of women recruited before conception: The LIFE study. Fertility and Sterility. In press. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  19. Early pregnancy loss. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/-/media/For-Patients/faq090.pdf. Accessed May 15, 2016.
  20. ACOG Practice Bulletin Number 150: Early pregnancy loss. May 2015. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstetetrics and Gynecology. 2015;125:1258.
  21. Wick, MJ (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. June 5, 2016.