Overview

Poor or deficient color vision is an inability to see the difference between certain colors, but color is still seen. Many people commonly use the term "colorblind" for this condition. But true colorblindness — in which everything is seen in shades of black and white — is rare.

Poor color vision is usually inherited. Men are more likely to be born with poor color vision. Most people with poor color vision can't distinguish between certain shades of red and green. Less commonly, people with poor color vision can't distinguish between shades of blue and yellow.

Certain eye diseases and some medications also can cause poor color vision.

Nov. 04, 2016
References
  1. Color vision deficiency. American Optometric Association. http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/eye-and-vision-problems/glossary-of-eye-and-vision-conditions/color-deficiency. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  2. Riordan-Eva P, et al. Retina. In: Vaughan & Asbury's General Ophthalmology. 18th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2011. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  3. Ropper AH, et al. Disturbances of vision. In: Adams & Victor's Principles of Neurology. 10th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  4. Komaromy AM, et al. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromaptopsia. Human Molecular Genetics. 2010;19:2581.
  5. Langlo CS, et al. Residual foveal cone structure in CNGB3-associated achromatopsia. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2016;57:3984.
  6. Simunovic MP. Acquired color vision deficiency. Survey of Ophthalmology. 2016;61:132.
  7. Ryan ST, et al. Color vision and night vision. In: Retina. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2013.