Treatment

There are no treatments for most types of color vision difficulties, unless the color vision problem is related to the use of certain medicines or eye conditions. Discontinuing the medication causing your vision problem or treating the underlying eye disease may result in better color vision.

Wearing a colored filter over eyeglasses or a colored contact lens may enhance your perception of contrast between colors. But such lenses won't improve your ability to see all colors.

Some rare retinal disorders associated with color deficiency could possibly be modified with gene replacement techniques. These treatments are under study and might become available in the future.

Nov. 04, 2016
References
  1. Color vision deficiency. American Optometric Association. http://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/eye-and-vision-problems/glossary-of-eye-and-vision-conditions/color-deficiency. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  2. Riordan-Eva P, et al. Retina. In: Vaughan & Asbury's General Ophthalmology. 18th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2011. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  3. Ropper AH, et al. Disturbances of vision. In: Adams & Victor's Principles of Neurology. 10th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw-Hill Companies; 2014. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Aug. 5, 2016.
  4. Komaromy AM, et al. Gene therapy rescues cone function in congenital achromaptopsia. Human Molecular Genetics. 2010;19:2581.
  5. Langlo CS, et al. Residual foveal cone structure in CNGB3-associated achromatopsia. Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2016;57:3984.
  6. Simunovic MP. Acquired color vision deficiency. Survey of Ophthalmology. 2016;61:132.
  7. Ryan ST, et al. Color vision and night vision. In: Retina. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Saunders; 2013.