Diagnosis

A pneumothorax is generally diagnosed using a chest X-ray. In some cases, a computerized tomography (CT) scan may be needed to provide more-detailed images. CT scanners combine X-ray images taken from many different directions to produce cross-sectional views of internal structures.

Jan. 28, 2016
References
  1. Mason RJ, et al. Pneumothorax, chylothorax, hemothorax, and fibrothorax. In: Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2010. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  2. Ferri FF. Pneumothorax, spontaneous. In: Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2016. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  3. Tintinalli JE, et al. Spontaneous and iatrogenic pneumothorax. In: Tintinalli's Emergency Medicine: A Comprehensive Study Guide. 7th ed. New York, N.Y.: The McGraw Hill Companies; 2011. http://www.accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  4. AskMayoExpert. Pneumothorax. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2015.
  5. Light RW. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  6. Light RW. Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Nov. 6, 2015.
  7. Barbara Woodward Lips Patient Education Center. Collapsed lung (pneumothorax). Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2009.