Pituitary tumors often go undiagnosed because their symptoms resemble those of other conditions. And some pituitary tumors are found because of medical tests for other conditions.

To diagnose a pituitary tumor, your doctor will likely take a detailed history and perform a physical exam. He or she might order:

  • Blood and urine tests. These can determine whether you have an overproduction or deficiency of hormones.
  • Brain imaging. A CT scan or MRI scan of your brain can help your doctor judge the location and size of a pituitary tumor.
  • Vision testing. This can determine if a pituitary tumor has impaired your sight or peripheral vision.

In addition, your doctor might refer you to an endocrinologist for more extensive testing.

Nov. 19, 2015
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  4. Loeffler JS, et al. Radiation therapy of pituitary adenomas. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 10, 2015.
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