Lifestyle and home remedies

Here are steps you can take to improve your skin and overall health:

  • Follow your doctor's wound care instructions. Taking good care of your wounds can help prevent infection and scarring.
  • Use talcum powder. Generously sprinkling talcum powder on your sheets may help keep oozing skin from sticking.
  • Take your medicines as prescribed. Stopping or changing the dose could cause your condition to worsen.
  • Clean towels, linens and clothing. Frequent cleaning of these items helps prevent your blisters and sores from becoming infected. Also, don't share such items with others.
  • Protect your skin. Avoid activities that may hurt or contaminate your wounds, such as playing contact sports or using a hot tub.
  • Avoid certain foods. Blisters in your mouth could be triggered or irritated by some foods, such as garlic, onion and abrasive foods.
  • Minimize sun exposure. Ultraviolet light may trigger new blisters.
  • Talk with your dentist about maintaining good oral health. If you have blisters in your mouth, it may be difficult to brush your teeth properly. Ask your dentist what you can do to protect your oral health.
  • Ask your doctor if you need calcium and vitamin D supplements. Corticosteroids can affect your calcium and vitamin D needs, so ask your doctor if you need a calcium supplement or other additional nutrients.

Coping and support

Pemphigus may be difficult to live with, especially if it affects your daily activities or makes you feel embarrassed. You may find it helpful to talk to others with the disease. You can find in-person or virtual support groups. Ask your doctor for suggestions.

Nov. 18, 2015
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