Preparing for your appointment

You're likely to first see your primary care doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in skin disorders (dermatologist).

Here's some information to help you get ready for your appointment.

What you can do

Before your appointment make a list of:

  • Symptoms you've been having and for how long
  • Key personal information, including any major stresses or recent life changes
  • All medications, vitamins and supplements you take, including doses
  • Questions to ask your doctor

For pemphigus, some basic questions to ask your doctor include:

  • What's the most likely cause of my symptoms?
  • Are there other possible causes?
  • Do I need any tests? Do these tests require any special preparation?
  • What treatments are available, and which do you recommend?
  • What side effects can I expect from treatment?
  • How long will it take for the blisters to heal? Will they leave scars?
  • Will the blisters come back again?
  • What can I do for the pain?
  • I have these other health conditions. How can I best manage them together?
  • Is there a generic alternative to the medicine you're prescribing me?
  • Do you have any brochures or other printed material I can take with me? What websites do you recommend?

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor is likely to ask you a number of questions, such as:

  • When did you first begin experiencing symptoms?
  • Does anything seem to improve your symptoms?
  • What steps have you taken to treat this condition yourself?
  • Have any of these measures helped?
  • Have you ever been treated by a doctor for this condition?
  • If so, did you use any prescription treatments for this skin condition? If so, do you remember the name of the medication and the dosage you were prescribed?
  • Did you have a skin biopsy?
Nov. 18, 2015
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