Preparing for your appointment

If you or your child has pectus excavatum, you might first discuss the matter with your family doctor. He or she may refer you to a doctor who specializes in pediatric or thoracic surgery.

What you can do

You may want to write a list that includes:

  • Detailed descriptions of the signs and symptoms
  • Information about past medical problems
  • Information about medical problems common in your family
  • All the medications and dietary supplements you or your child takes
  • Questions you want to ask the doctor, including what treatments are available

What to expect from your doctor

Your doctor may ask some of the following questions:

  • When did these signs and symptoms begin?
  • Have they worsened recently?
  • Has anyone else in your family had a similar problem?
May 02, 2017
References
  1. Kliegman RM, et al. Skeletal diseases influencing pulmonary function. In: Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2016. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  2. Mayer OH. Pectus excavatum: Etiology and evaluation. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  3. AskMayoExpert. Pectus excavatum. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2016.
  4. Holcomb GW, et al. Congenital chest wall deformities. In: Ashcraft's Pediatric Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2014. http://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  5. Mayer OH. Pectus excavatum: Treatment. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Jan. 18, 2017.
  6. Jaroszewski DE, et al. Success of minimally invasive pectus excavatum procedures (modified Nuss) in adult patients. Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2016;102:993.
  7. Brown AY. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. Jan. 30, 2017.
  8. Jaroszewski DE (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Phoenix/Scottsdale, Ariz. Feb. 12, 2017.