Self-management

Lifestyle and home remedies

To help decrease the effects of PCOS, try to:

  • Maintain a healthy weight. Weight loss can reduce insulin and androgen levels and may restore ovulation. Ask your doctor about a weight-control program, and meet regularly with a dietitian for help in reaching weight-loss goals.
  • Limit carbohydrates. Low-fat, high-carbohydrate diets might increase insulin levels. Ask your doctor about a low-carbohydrate diet if you have PCOS. Choose complex carbohydrates, which raise your blood sugar levels more slowly.
  • Be active. Exercise helps lower blood sugar levels. If you have PCOS, increasing your daily activity and participating in a regular exercise program may treat or even prevent insulin resistance and help you keep your weight under control and avoid developing diabetes.
Aug. 29, 2017
References
  1. Lobo RA, et al. Polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  2. AskMayoExpert. Polycystic ovary syndrome. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; 2017.
  3. Barbieri RL, et al. Clinical manifestations of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  4. Jameson JL, et al., eds. Hyperandrogenism, hirsutism, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In: Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2016. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  5. Barbieri RL, et al. Treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  6. Barbieri RL, et al. Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 27, 2017.
  7. Azziz R. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of the polycystic ovary syndrome in adults. https://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  8. Jones MR, et al. Genetic determinants of polycystic ovary syndrome: Progress and future directions. Fertility and Sterility. 2016;106:25.
  9. Lobo RA, et al. Anatomic defects of the abdominal wall and pelvic floor: Abdominal hernias, inguinal hernias, and pelvic organ prolapse: Diagnosis and management. In: Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier; 2017. https://www.clinicalkey.com. Accessed April 28, 2017.
  10. Warner KJ. Allscripts EPSi. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. April 11, 2017.
  11. George JT, et al. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2016;101:4313.
  12. Chang AY, et al. Influence of race/ethnicity on cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome, the Dallas Heart Study. Clinical Endocrinology. 2016;85:92.
  13. Javed A, et al. Fasting glucose changes in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome compared to obese controls: A retrospective cohort study. Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. 2016;28:451.